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Canby native L. Lee Shaw has a new book out that looks at two generations at opposite ends of life

An exploration of two generations at opposite ends of life is the thrust behind a new book from Molalla author L. Lee Shaw and her new work, "Aging Out."

A young adult novel, the 234-page work explores the world of three troubled teens who are soon to be aged out of the group foster they share with no idea of how to find their future. Assigned to work at a geriatric care facility, they meet residents with little future left, who are also facing the loss of their home, and with it their only remaining "family."

"Aging Out represents the convergence of experiences from my past," said Shaw of her new work. "As a teenager, I worked in a nursing home where I saw residents piece together a final family from other residents.

"In my 20s, I volunteered with a project supporting street kids," she added. "The young people I met were escaping hideously misshaped families, but they formed a semblance of one through alliances with other homeless kids. Reflecting on these memories, I wanted to explore what constitutes home and family, especially for people who have minimal say over the circumstances of their lives."

Shaw, who grew up in Canby, is the owner of the independent publishing house, Boho Books. She has published two novels, "Blood Will Tell…" and "Monster Child." Her new work is available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Indie Bound and Powell's City of Books.

The Canby Herald

Book Synopsis:

Myron is a member of the town's notorious criminal family. Soosie tried to kill her sister. Adam was thrown away by his family. The only thing they have in common is they are all wards of the state currently housed in a group home, and they are all 17. When they no longer qualify for the state's protection at 18, they will be dumped out of the system, regardless of where they might end up. To provide a small handhold when they are on their own; the trio is assigned to work at a geriatric care center.

Grappling with trying to figure out their swiftly approaching futures, the teens are met with a group whose life is nearly all past but who still carry determination to have a say in whatever days they have remaining. When the care center is threatened with closing, the elders reach back into their own formative years for the means to fight back. Drawn in, the teens find they are stretched in ways that opens them to unexpected possibilities.

Contract Publishing

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