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The Canby Herald, each week, publishes stories and headlines from days gone by, reminding each Canby resident of the rich and vibrant history that makes up our town, now affectionately known as The Garden Spot.

H.H. Eccles, teacher, dies; rites today

— September 15, 1955 —

Funeral services for Howard H. Eccles, 78, a school teacher in the Canby vicinity more than 50 years, will be held Thursday, Sept. 15, at 1:30 p.m., from the Canby chapel of Everhart & Kent. Interment will be in Zion Memorial Park beside Mrs. Eccles, who passed away August 10, 1954.

Principal of Canby grade school from 1913 until 1945, Mr. Eccles passed on about 8:30 p.m., Monday, at the Canby Nursing Home where he had been cared for since August 27 following paralysis of both legs. He had been under treatment last winter for cancer.

A teacher from the time he was 17 years old until his retirement at 73, Howard Hayes Eccles had his schooling at Woodburn and later at Oregon Normal school, now Oregon College of Education, at Monmouth.

He taught the White school near Hubbard, then came to the Canby vicinity in 1897 to teach the one-room school at Riverside. He later taught at Mundorf before taking over the principalship at Canby grade school where he served for 32 years. After retirement here in 1945, Aurora school directors persuaded him to take over the principalship there, a post he held for four years.

For many years he was associated with the Clackamas County Fair, and also had handled real estate and accountancy assignments. Last spring, after showing marked improvement following illness in the winter, he had offered his services in income tax assistance locally.

Born Oct. 6, 1876, in Brownsville, Pa., he was the only child of John Eccles and Caroline J. Carter Eccles. With his mother he came to Oregon as a young child, first to Portland and later to Woodburn where he attended school. He was married to Blanche Bullock Sept. 19, 1911, in Portland, and they had made their home continuously in Canby since, in their later years in an apartment at 685 N.W. Fourth Avenue.

Friends recalled this week that he had told of having received his first school teacher's pay, $30 a month, in gold coins.

Many of his early pupils are great-grandparents now, since some of them were but a few years younger than their teacher. At a reception held in his honor on his retirement at Canby 10 years ago, Mrs. Henry Kraft, who had been his student in Riverside in 1900, her son, Emil, who was in his classes in Canby, and Emil's daughter, Ethel, who was a primary student during his Canby principalship, sang trio selections, reminding him that his teaching work had covered three generations.

Funeral services for Howard H. Eccles, 78, a school teacher in the Canby vicinity more than 50 years, will be held Thursday, Sept. 15, at 1:30 p.m., from the Canby chapel of Everhart & Kent. Interment will be in Zion Memorial Park beside Mrs. Eccles, who passed away August 10, 1954.

Principal of Canby grade school from 1913 until 1945, Mr. Eccles passed on about 8:30 p.m., Monday, at the Canby Nursing Home where he had been cared for since August 27 following paralysis of both legs. He had been under treatment last winter for cancer.

A teacher from the time he was 17 years old until his retirement at 73, Howard Hayes Eccles had his schooling at Woodburn and later at Oregon Normal school, now Oregon College of Education, at Monmouth.

He taught the White school near Hubbard, then came to the Canby vicinity in 1897 to teach the one-room school at Riverside. He later taught at Mundorf before taking over the principalship at Canby grade school where he served for 32 years. After retirement here in 1945, Aurora school directors persuaded him to take over the principalship there, a post he held for four years.

For many years he was associated with the Clackamas County Fair, and also had handled real estate and accountancy assignments. Last spring, after showing marked improvement following illness in the winter, he had offered his services in income tax assistance locally.

Born Oct. 6, 1876, in Brownsville, Pa., he was the only child of John Eccles and Caroline J. Carter Eccles. With his mother he came to Oregon as a young child, first to Portland and later to Woodburn where he attended school. He was married to Blanche Bullock Sept. 19, 1911, in Portland, and they had made their home continuously in Canby since, in their later years in an apartment at 685 N.W. Fourth Avenue.

Friends recalled this week that he had told of having received his first school teacher's pay, $30 a month, in gold coins.

Many of his early pupils are great-grandparents now, since some of them were but a few years younger than their teacher. At a reception held in his honor on his retirement at Canby 10 years ago, Mrs. Henry Kraft, who had been his student in Riverside in 1900, her son, Emil, who was in his classes in Canby, and Emil's daughter, Ethel, who was a primary student during his Canby principalship, sang trio selections, reminding him that his teaching work had covered three generations.

Weird sounds of phone halt hunt for rats

— December 25, 1952 —

A telephone receiver was off a hook and Operator Rena Reynolds tried to attract the subscriber's attention by making a clicking noise in the receiver.

She could hear voices occasionally near the telephone, but nobody picked up the instrument. She kept on clicking at intervals for half an hour.

Finally when she heard voices again she thought of another way to attract attention. She whistled shrilly, just as she had learned to do when she was a youngster in school.

The whistle got results. Roy L. Mangus picked up his telephone.

"We thought that clicking was rats in the wall," he explained to Operator Reynolds. "Mrs. Mangus and I each had a club and we were looking for 'em. When you whistled I realized all of a sudden that rats don't whistle, and picked up the 'phone."

Dedication draws 300 to school

— December 6, 1956 —STOCK PHOTO - Canby Telephone operators take a break from the switchboards at the office in 1955.

Dedication of Canby's new primary school building, erected at a cost to District 86 of $7.79 per square foot for a total of $96,042, drew an attendance of 300 Friday evening to the recently-completed structure on N.W. Fifth Avenue at Douglas Street.

Leslie G. Rood, county superintendent of schools, but principal at Canby when the new building was in the planning stage, was the dedication speaker. He emphasized the low cost per square foot, and explained why the building is situated as it is, across the grounds from the 1948-dedicated main building.

Not more than 500 boys and girls should be housed in any one school building, the state department of education recommends. Cafeteria and play space cannot be provided adequately for a greater number, the department contends. Therefore, instead of adding a wing to the main building as was planned originally, the new primary school building was built, affording cafeteria and play space for students enrolled here.

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