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The somewhat recent extremely bad weather, such as January, was some of the worst we can remember, doing various damages to our property

The somewhat recent extremely bad weather, such as January, was some of the worst we can remember, doing various damages to our property, including many of our longtime fruit trees.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS - John and Sherien Jaeger propped up some heritage apple trees that had fallen in the winter storms. They rerooted and now have tiny apples growing on them.In our front yard, a Jonathan apple tree was knocked to the ground. In our backyard, our Miller family ancestor's historical Miller prune tree was also knocked to the ground.

At first we didn't know what to do about these damaged fruit trees. Most people would have cut them up and had them hauled away.

We decided to try to push them back up again. Luckily, we have an automotive-type floor jack on small wheels, with a 2-ton lifting capacity. With the help of various length boards and the floor jack, we both spent considerable time and finally did lift both trees back up.

We obviously could have called a professional landscaping service, but that probably would have been very expensive, thus, we as amateurs just did it ourselves.

The historic trees are now continuing to grow and produce fruit.

John and Sherien Jaeger

Oak Grove

Act now on transportation

Getting around easily has long been a part of what makes Oregon a great place to live — a source of pride and prosperity. We've long enjoyed the reliability of getting to work on time, getting home to our families quickly and safely, and getting out of town for the weekend.

Lately, it feels different. Getting around is increasingly frustrating.

As mayors, county chairs and regional leaders, we see it throughout our region's communities.

Our constituents feel it when they wait in traffic for an hour — just to move a few miles. They feel it when they have to apologize for being late to work ... again. They feel it when they worry about loved ones making it home. They even feel it when local businesses wait longer for products to arrive in stores, and families pay more for those products.

We have two choices to preserve our quality of life: We can take action now, or let the challenges deepen as the fixes get more expensive. This is bigger than any one city, county or metro area. This affects us all, which is why we must all work together.

We want to let it be known: We are united and ready to move forward. We support our lawmakers working on a statewide transportation package that makes strategic investments that keep people safe and serve our communities. By taking this action together, we succeed together.

Let's act now to fight the congestion, help our families live better, help our employers stay competitive, and get us all where we want to be.

Lake Oswego Mayor Kent Studebaker, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, Clackamas County Chair Jim Bernard, Washington County Chair Andy Duyck, Metro Council President Tom Hughes, Beaverton Mayor Denny Doyle, Cornelius Mayor Jeff Dalin, Durham Mayor Gery Schirado, Fairview Mayor Ted Tosterud, Forest Grove Mayor Pete Truax, Gresham Mayor Shane Bemis, Happy Valley Mayor Lori DeRemer, Hillsboro Mayor Steve Callaway, King City Mayor Ken Gibson, Milwaukie Mayor Mark Gamba, Oregon City Mayor Dan Holladay, Rivergrove Mayor Heather Kibbey, Sherwood Mayor Krisanna Clark, Tigard Mayor John Cook, Troutdale Mayor Casey Ryan, Tualatin Mayor Lou Ogden, West Linn Mayor Russ Axelrod, Wilsonville Mayor Tim Knapp, Wood Village Mayor Tim Clark, TriMet General Manager Neil McFarlane and Port of Portland Executive Director Curtis Robinhold

Oregon leading the way on climate change

I would like to applaud the Pamplin Media Group for the recent article on the Oregon Business Alliance for Climate (OBAC) ("Business group announces effort to push for carbon pricing," Sustainable Life section June 16). I just returned from Washington D.C. where I met with the staff of Senators Wyden and Merkley regarding the issue of climate change, along with other members of the local chapter of Citizens' Climate Lobby. I appreciate that both senators are committed to environmental issues on behalf of Oregonians, but realize that they also need the support of the business community in order to pass climate legislation.

It is commendable that groups like OBAC are helping to build the political will to address climate change. I agree with their founding statement: "...climate change is already risking the health of Oregon's economy, causing wildfires, depleted snow pack and ocean acidification. Climate change poses grave risks to the state's agriculture, fisheries, recreation, manufacturing, financial, energy and natural resource industries."

While these risks are very real, it is refreshing to see that the business community is realizing that there can be vast economic opportunities amid the hardships. A revenue-neutral fee on carbon with an equal divided returned to all American households would create 2.8 million jobs and increase the GDP by 1.375 billion dollars over 20 years, according to a 2014 study by Regional Economic Modeling Incorporated. A recent study from the Treasury Department backs up this finding.

Our leaders need to hear from constituents and businesses alike, supporting a price on carbon. In Oregon we have always been pioneers and innovators. I am happy to see this tradition continuing through organizations like OBAC.

Heather Saul

Oregon City

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