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Police capture pig after struggle

Porker's gambit ends thanks to canny officer, alert citizen


The pig file of the Lake Oswego Police Department has just added another case.

A round but elusive pink pig escaped all efforts to catch it the evening of May 16 near Freepons Park until Officer John Brent of the Lake Oswego Police Department arrived and cornered the annoyed animal. The pig was extremely fast and very loud, but Brent was able to grab the squealing rascal and place it in his patrol car. by: BILL ABADIE - This pig was having a good time rooting around until it was captured and placed behind bars after a squealing struggle. It is now safe and sound back home.

The pig was transported to the LOPD’s downtown headquarters and placed in a holding cell. The next move was to contact Officer Ulli Neitch of the Milwaukie Police Department, who is widely known for her work with animals. Neitch said she was just getting into a patrol car to drive to Lake Oswego when she got the word that the pig’s owner had called and had taken the pig back home.

This story had a happy ending, but for a while it was touch and go.

It started on May 16 at around 5 p.m. when Bill Abadie, a resident of Meadows Drive, came upon the pig rooting around in a yard at the corner of Meadows and Hemlock. The action began when Abadie’s neighbor, Betsy Ouchida, came along walking her dog, which spotted the pig and pulled her over so he could get nose-to-nose with the animal.

“The pig was about 25 pounds and pink and white — about the size of a pot bellied pig,” Abadie said. “He wasn’t afraid of us or the dog.”

Abadie sprang into action and tried to capture the pig, but the pig would not allow him to get close. So, Abadie reported the loose pig to police. Fifteen minutes later Brent arrived. He was the right man for the job.

“He’s an expert,” said LOPD Capt. Dale Jorgensen. “He is quite the animal whisperer. Whenever we have weird animal calls he seems to be on duty. He handled the case of the bald eagle caught in the tree and recently with the cougar sightings.”

It was no easy task, however, for Brent to corral the pig, who was determined to keep on rooting. Abadie was fortunate enough to observe the whole incident.

“It was really funny watching him trying to grab the pig and put it in the back of the patrol car,” Abadie said.

Brent kept his sense of humor during the situation, cracking pig jokes the entire time, and finally got the pig in custody by pretending to have food.

Brent’s fellow officers were delighted that he brought in the pig and tried to take photos of it in the patrol car. Only an hour and a half after the pig was put behind bars, the LOPD got a phone call.

“I’ve lost my pig,” a man said.

“We were able to reunite them,” said Jorgensen, who noted there was another pig-on-the-loose incident several years ago.

News that the pig was home again was greeted with relief.

“It was good to hear,” Abadie said. “I’m glad it didn’t end up on somebody’s breakfast table.”