FONT

MORE STORIES


Total collections will increase by 6.5 percent in 2017-18, even as real market value jumps by 10 percent and assessed (taxable) values by 4.7 percent.

Clackamas County property owners as a group will pay 6.5 percent more in taxes, to $811.5 million, in their 2017-18 bills just sent out.

Assessor Bob Vroman has sent 174,654 statements.

As elsewhere in the Portland metropolitan area, Clackamas County's real-market property values, though not the basis for tax bills, continue to grow by 10 percent.

The increased tax collections amount to $49.5 million over last year.

Voters countywide last year approved a bond issue, at 10 cents per $1,000 of taxable property value, to upgrade the emergency radio communications system.

Approval of a bond issue will increase the Lake Oswego School District rate from 95 cents to $2.09 — bond issues are outside statewide property tax limits — and approvals of a new Molalla Aquatic District and annexation of Boring Fire with Clackamas County Fire District No. 1 also will increase tax levies. For the aquatic district, whose boundaries are the same as the school district, it is 29 cents; for Boring Fire, it is 10.63 cents.

Some approved tax measures will replace expiring bonds or levies and will not result in higher tax rates.

Although the statewide limits generally restrict growth in property tax bills to 3 percent annually, taxes can go up because of voter approvals of levies and bonds outside the limits, and new construction and improvements that add value to property.

Real market value of property countywide rose 10 percent from $63.5 billion to $69.9 billion. Such values have been increasing since 2013, following the economic downturn in 2008.

Assessed value — the basis for most property tax payments — rose 4.7 percent from $46.4 billion to $48.6 billion.

The average residential property grew 8.7 in real market value to $418,358 — and in assessed value, 3.7 percent to $281,858. The median point for residential property — where half the values are above and half are below — is $363,956, a 10 percent increase from last year.

School districts claim 42.06 percent of all tax collections; countywide services, 18.71 percent; cities and fire protection districts, 23.37 percent. The rest goes to community college, education service district, urban renewal, regional agencies and services.

Oregon voters limited overall property tax rates in 1990 — $5 per $1,000 of taxable value for education, $10 for all other agencies combined, excluding bond issues. In 1996 and 1997, they rolled back and then limited growth in taxable values.

Many property owners pay taxes as part of their mortgages. The first deadline for those who pay property taxes separately is Nov. 15; other due dates are Feb. 15 and May 15.

The assessor is in the Development Services Building, 150 Beavercreek Road, Oregon City. Hours are 7 a.m. to 6 p.m Monday through Thursday. The office is closed Fridays, and will close Thursday, Nov. 9, in honor of Veterans Day.

Telephones: (503) 655-8671 for general information, or 655-8662 if there is a question about property valuations. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

twitter.com/capitolwong

For a link to the release by Clackamas County Assessor Bob Vroman:

www.clackamas.us/pressreleases/documents/pr20171016a.pdf

Open houses

Clackamas County Assessor Bob Vroman and his staff have scheduled open houses during which people may ask questions about property tax bills and values. The schedule:

Nov. 1 (Wednesday), 7-8:30 p.m., Rooms 119-120, Development Services Building, 150 Beavercreek Road, Oregon City. Questions about all areas.

Nov. 6, 12:30-2 p.m., Sandy Community and Senior Center, 38348 Pioneer Blvd.

Nov. 7, 2-3:30 p.m., Gladstone Senior Center, 1050 Portland Ave.

Nov. 7, 7-8:30 p.m., Damascus Community Church, 14251 SE Rust Way.

Nov. 8, 7-8:30 p.m., Milwaukie Center, 5440 SE Kellogg Creek Drive.

Nov. 13, 2-3:30 p.m., Lake Oswego Adult Community Center, 505 G Ave.

Contract Publishing

Go to top