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STORM STORIES

by: DAVID F. ASHTON - This huge Eastmoreland tree split, and came crashing down across S.E. Woodstock Boulevard at 34th Avenue at Reed College. Weather forecasters predicted bad weather for the last weekend in September, severe enough to cause some damage, for an unusual winter storm arriving right at the start of autumn.

The wind did blow, and a considerable amount of rain fell – a record 1.89 inches on October 28 and 1.03 inches on October 29, according to the rain gauge at THE BEE – but the big news was mainly that weather that would have seemed common in January set all-time records here in September.

The first tree limbs and debris downed by the storm were spotted on S.E. Flavel Drive at 45th Avenue. Denny and Marsha Hubel were cutting up branches that had fallen in the street.

A block away, on S.E. Rex Street, also near 45th Avenue, East Precinct police officers helped remove fallen branches from the roadway.

But, the falling foliage that most caught the attention of the television newsrooms on September 28th was a large limb that came down in Eastmoreland, on S.E. 28th Avenue between Bybee Boulevard and Tolman Street, taking utility lines with it.

The following evening, September 29, a Portland Parks & Recreation worker, on his way to clean and close the public restroom at Berkeley Park, S.E. 39th (Chavez) and Bybee Boulevard, swerved off the narrow paved path, drove onto the rain-soaked turf – and needed to be rescued by a tow truck.

Then, during the early hours of October 1, another large limb split off a tree at S.E. Woodstock Boulevard and 34th Avenue. Surprised morning commuters drove this way and that through Eastmoreland, trying to find another route into the city. The force of this falling branch across utility lines bordering Reed College snapped the utility pole like a twig near the center, and closed Woodstock Boulevard till it was all cleaned up.

There were no reports of serious storm-related damage to homes or vehicles, however, in Inner Southeast Portland.