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'According to the cops and corporations, it's up to us to spot funny money, no matter how well it is replicated'

PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP FILE PHOTO - A counterfeit detector pen, sold commercially, is marketed as being able to spot "funny money." If the bill turns yellow where marked, says the manufacturer, it is legitimate. Some say counterfeiters have discovered ways to defeat the pens, however. 
I'm writing this letter to warn people about an apparent lack of concern by law enforcement involving unfortunate recipients of counterfeit money. About two months ago my sister, after purchasing a few items at Fred Meyer in Scappoose, received change of a $100 bill. She then proceeded across the highway to the Goodwill where she bought a few more items, which were paid for with a $20 bill out of the change from Fred Meyer.

As luck would have it, the clerk at Goodwill just happened to notice that the $20 bill didn't look right. After a brief detainment and interrogation by local law enforcement, my sister asked them if it was possible to recover the loss from the confiscated bill. It turned out to be a stupid question. Apparently, multi-million dollar corporations and their employees are not responsible for valued customers receiving phony cash.

Buyer beware. According to the cops and corporations, it's up to us to spot funny money, no matter how well it is replicated. I wonder how that works for a blind person.

In my opinion, this slight on us little people isn't due to phony money, but rather phony policy.

James Harris

Scappoose

Contract Publishing

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