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The oceans off Oregon and Washington are ground zero for ocean acidification, and Northwest scientists are working on new ways to adapt.

GREG DAVIS, COURTESY OF EARTHFIX - Stephen Schreck (left) and Ryan Cox of Puget Sound Restoration Fund collect kelp samples.Brian Allen is up to his elbows in cold, black water. He's hanging over the side of a small boat, trying to pull in a tangle of ropes.

They're heavy and being dragged sideways by the current. He strains against them.

Allen is a researcher with the Puget Sound Restoration Fund. He's working within a 2.5 acre plot of open water near the mouth of Hood Canal, west of Seattle. The area is roped off on two ends, and inside dozens of buoys bob in the low chop.

The oceans off Oregon and Washington are ground zero for ocean acidification, and Northwest scientists have been at the forefront of a new line of research. They're testing whether marine plants can help shellfish, and the more than $200 million industry built around them, cope with these changes.

To read the rest of this story, go to EarthFix, at www.opb.org/news/article/kelp-seagrass-oysters-ocean-change/

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