Featured Stories

Other Pamplin Media Group sites


Sandy Actors Theatre gears up for new season

Joseph Kesselring’s “Arsenic and Old Lace” will kick off the season at the Sandy Actors Theatre. The play opens Sept. 13 and runs through Oct. 6.

The classic play involves a drama critic who must deal with his eccentric family and local police in Brooklyn, N.Y., as he debates whether to marry the woman he loves. Meanwhile, two spinster aunts end the presumed suffering of lonely old bachelors by serving them elderberry wine spiked with arsenic, strychnine, and “just a pinch” of cyanide.

The Post caught up backstage with Lissie Huff, who plays Elaine Harper in the show. The 15-year theater veteran said she’s excited to be in the production.by: POST PHOTO: NEIL ZAWICKI - Lissie Huff and Nathan Wright, playing Elaine and Mortimer in the Sandy Actors Theater production of Arsenic and Old Lace, rehearse a scene Friday night. The show opens Sept 13.

“It’s such a funny play and you get to say some just really kind of fantastic lines,” she said. This is the first time Huff, who lives in downtown Portland, will do the play. Previously, she performed in “You can’t take it with you,” by George S. Kaufman.

“It’s a similar play because there’s a lot of like ‘not sure who knows what’s going on,’” she said.

Another theater veteran, Nathan Wright, plays Mortimer. He’s been doing theater for close to 20 years, and got his start with “Arsenic and Old Lace.”

“I love this play,” he said. “This is my third experience doing this show. It’s funny, and this is how I got exposed to theater. I have fun every time I do it.”

Wright said he played both the dead bodies in the play when he was in junior high school, and played Jonathan, the villain in the play, a few years back. He said rehearsals are coming along nicely.

“Everybody’s bringing something new to the table,” he said.

The Sandy Actors Theater season also includes “The Game’s Afoot,” by Ken Ludwig; “Almost, Maine” by John Cariani; “Twelfth Night or What You Will” by William Shakespeare; and “The Fantasticks,” by Tom Jones, with music by Harvey Schmidt.