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Ahead of schedule and on budget, extension of road between SW Barber Street and Boeckman Road is done

SUBMITTED PHOTO: CITY OF WILSONVILLE - Workers install pipe at the site of the Kinsman Road extension project. The City of Wilsonville announced Jan. 12 the new Kinsman Road extension connecting Southwest Barber Street and Boeckman Road has finished five months ahead of deadline and on budget.

In addition to providing another connection for motorists, construction of the roadway simultaneously incorporated other water and sewer infrastructure projects resulting in reduced public disruption and cost.

City Engineer Zach Weigel said not only did favorable weather play a role in the project's advanced timeline, but coordination between several agencies with the help of OBEC Consulting Engineers helped the project's efficiency. SUBMITTED GRAPHIC: CITY OF WILSONVILLE - The location of the Kinsman Road extension project between Boeckman Road and Barber Street.

"We had weekly meetings talking a lot with the contractor and all agencies involved. We had a project management team from OBEC Consulting Engineers who were also very helpful with the project. I would say that those weekly meetings where we talked through things coming up and issues happening and scheduling really helped out," Weigel told the Spokesman.

Originally scheduled for completion in June 2018, the $8.6 million half-mile-long roadway segment, located between Villebois and the industrial westside of Wilsonville, connects two major arterials, greatly improves the city street-grid and provides increased connectivity for both freight and residential traffic, according to a City press release. The new Kinsman Road extension was constructed as a heavy-duty concrete roadway complete with sidewalks and bike lanes that also provides increased public access to the Wilsonville Transit Center, including SMART Central bus and Tri-Met Westside Express commuter rail service.SUBMITTED PHOTO: CITY OF WILSONVILLE -  The west side of the new roadway features an extra-wide sidewalk and benches for wildlife and habitat viewing. Fencing along the road and a series of wildlife corridor passages beneath Kinsman Road, including round and box culverts, were constructed to improve safety for both drivers and wildlife.

The Coffee Lake wetlands complex adjoins both sides of the Kinsman Road extension. The west side of the new roadway features an extra-wide sidewalk and benches for wildlife and habitat viewing. Fencing along the road and a series of wildlife corridors beneath Kinsman Road, including round and box culverts, were constructed to improve safety for both drivers and wildlife. These details maintain wildlife corridors within an urban landscape and mirror the natural resource protection previously achieved with the Boeckman Road project that also crosses the wetlands.

The City also installed over 3,000 feet of new sewer line in the acquired road right-of-way that is designed to serve the regionally significant Coffee Creek industrial area now under development.

A total of 90 local jobs are estimated to have been sustained during the course of the 12-month-long project.

City Community Development Director Nancy Kraushaar said the Kinsman Road extension project is "a real win-win for the public that provides new travel options, as well as reduced costs for additional major water and sewer projects."

Weigel and his team worked to combine $5.1 million of other public infrastructure projects with the long-planned road extension in order to more efficiently use taxpayer-funds.

The Kinsman Road project included installation of a $4 million segment of a major drinking-water pipeline and a $1.1 million sanitary sewer pipe. Simultaneous construction of the road, the Willamette Water Supply Program (WWSP) water pipeline and the sewer project allowed various local governments to save money and minimize disruption.

"Residents of Wilsonville like to see projects come in at the cost they were expecting. I think a lot of the coordination between agencies and having a great contractor really led to the project going smoothly and not having a lot of cost overrun," Weigel said.

Funding for the combined $13.7 million road-sewer-water pipeline project came from City transportation and wastewater system development charges, federal/state funds and the ratepayers of the TVWD and City of Hillsboro.

Contact Pamplin Media Group reporter Sam Stites at 503-636-1281 ext. 101 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..