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Story from our friends at The Reser. The Reser adds to downtown Beaverton's growing public art collection with four new installations.

PMG PHOTOS: JAIME VALDEZ - This is Common Threads

Common Threads, by local artists Addie Boswell, Van Cooley, Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos), and Antwoine Thomas, is a seven-story mural painted directly on the walls of the Beaverton central District parking garage.The Patricia Reser Center for the Arts — a design marvel in its own right — brings with it four more additions to Beaverton's collection of public art, fostering the city's identity around art and newfound creativity.

The themes of each public art piece play together with the architecture and design of The Reser itself, as well as the surrounding landscape of Beaverton Creek.

"Because of Beaverton's Percent for Art program, at least 1% of The Reser's construction budget had to be allocated to public art from the start," explains Laura Becker, Manager of the City of Beaverton Arts Program. "The dichotomy of Beaverton's natural landscape alongside the new building was a running theme when curating each piece."

"The vision for these works was informed by the notion of manufactured landscapes in a close proximity to nature — this built, urban environment butted up to a very beautiful natural area," says Becker. That was the theme and the framework."

The addition to Beaverton's public art collection includes two pieces on the exterior of The Reser's adjacent parking garage. With Common Threads, local artists Addie Boswell, Van Cooley, Sara Siestreem (Hanis Coos), and Antwoine Thomas created a seven-story mural painted directly on the aluminum-paneled walls of the Beaverton Central District parking garage. Gather, by Seattle-based artist William Schlough, depicts butterflies from Beaverton Creek entering the parking garage's north side. PMG PHOTOS: JAIME VALDEZ - Ribbon is a public art installation by Jason Klimoski and Lesley Chang of StudioKCA located on the main plaza along Crescent Street.PMG PHOTOS: JAIME VALDEZ - Puff is a hanging sculpture by artists Jacqueline Metz and Nancy Chew, and is the centerpiece of The Reser's main lobby.PMG PHOTOS: JAIME VALDEZ - Gather, by Seattle-based artist William Schlough, depicts butterflies from Beaverton Creek entering the parking garage's north side.

Ribbon, by Jason Klimoski and Lesley Chang of StudioKCA, is a steel sculpture located in The Res-er's main Plaza on Crescent Street. Puff, a hanging sculpture by artists Jacqueline Metz and Nancy Chew, is the main art piece of The Reser's interior, located inside the main lobby.

"The building's lobby is open to the public, and everyone is welcome to experience and enjoy the artwork whenever The Reser's doors are open," says December Carson, Director of Marketing and Patron Services.

These four pieces join a growing collection of murals and sculptures around Beaverton.

Three Creeks, One Will, a 37-foot sculpture by Devin Laurence Field that was installed at The Round in 2013, is another public art piece created as a tribute to Beaverton's past, future, and natural features — specifically the city's three creeks. In 2021, Insignia, a sculpture by Blessing Hancock depicting three abstract Beaverton Police Department badges, was installed outside Beaverton's Public Safety

"The vision for these works was informed by the notion of manufactured landscapes in a close proximity to nature — this built, urban environment butted up to a very beautiful natural area. That was the theme and the framework."

Laura Becker Manager, City of Beaverton Arts Program

Center, at Southwest Hall and Allen Boulevard, just south of Downtown.

Beaverton's art program continues to spread across the city, and the additions at The Reser are just the next step.

The Reser's public art works each embrace the city's relationship between nature and the man-made a little differently. Gather depicts endangered Fender's Blue butterflies migrating into a sliding barn door from Beaverton Creek, carrying the city's natural landscape into The Reser. The abstract outdoor structure Ribbon merges with the Creek, representing the water that cuts through Beaverton and defines its landscape. The indoor mirrored ball puff depicts a dandelion puff — but one that's metallic and manufactured.

Common Threads addresses themes of Beaverton's history and its Indigenous roots. The mural carries the idea that creativity thrives in a community that has a strong foundation to build upon.

Because of its strong foundation, Beaverton continues to evolve. According to Becker, "The Reser will be a game-changer for the city."

"The Reser hopes to inspire Beaverton to celebrate its identity around the arts," says Becker, "and the center itself will be the start of a more creative future for Beaverton."

"The Reser is going to sit at what will be the city's major arts and innovation district, and will be the seed of that district," says Becker. "It's a pretty major seed, but I think that there will be all kinds of creative, innovative businesses that spring up around the area and give downtown a cultural core."

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