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Doyle, who served as mayor from 2009 to 2020, pleaded not guilty in federal court Friday.

PMG FILE PHOTO - Denny Doyle, who served three terms as mayor of Beaverton, will appear in federal court Friday, March 4, to face a charge of possession of child pornography.Dennis "Denny" Doyle, a three-term former mayor of Beaverton, was arraigned in federal court Friday, March 4, for possession of child pornography.

Between November 2014 and December 2015, Doyle allegedly possessed digital material containing child pornography, according to prosecutors. The charges suggest Doyle knowingly possessed the material, which included images of minors under 12 years old.

Doyle pleaded not guilty to the felony charge Friday.

Magistrate Judge Jolie Russo scheduled a two-day jury trial for Tuesday, May 10.

Doyle was not detained, but Pretrial Services will decide whether he can continue weekly visits with his 5- through 14-year-old grandchildren.

A Pretrial Services representative said during the hearing Doyle will likely be prohibited from contacting any minors, including his grandchildren, but Doyle and his attorney, Elizabeth Daily, will meet with the office for a final decision.

The city of Beaverton provided a written statement in response to the charge brought by U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug.

"The city is aware, shocked and disheartened. At this time, we do not have any details and cannot comment on the situation. We are directing all inquiries and questions to the U.S. Attorney's Office," city spokeswoman Dianna Ballash said on behalf of the city.

Doyle, 73, served as Beaverton's mayor from 2009 to 2020, when he lost a re-election bid to current Mayor Lacey Beaty. Before that, Doyle served on the Beaverton City Council for 14 years.

In a written statement, Beaty said, "Like you, I am shocked by the news today. We elect leaders with the expectation that they will serve, protect and advocate for our children, families, and communities. The charges against former Mayor Doyle are deeply concerning."

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexual conduct involving a minor.

If convicted, Doyle could serve up to 20 years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine and a life term of supervised release.

According to information Asphaug submitted to the court, the child pornography was turned over to authorities on a 64GB thumb drive.

The case was investigated by FBI Portland's Child Exploitation Task Force, and the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Oregon is prosecuting the case.

Though Doyle lost his bid for a fourth term in 2020, he has remained active in the community. Just earlier this week, he and Beaty jointly cut the ribbon to ceremonially open the Patricia Reser Center for the Arts in Beaverton, of which Doyle has been a major backer. The former mayor and his wife, Ann Doyle, donated between $25,000 and $99,000 to the center.

Denny Doyle worked closely with Patricia Reser — community activist and major donor of the center — in bringing Reser's vision for the performing arts center to fruition.

Doyle was first elected mayor in 2008, ousting former mayor Rob Drake in a contentious election. After his election, he formed a visioning committee that confirmed the city's desire for an arts center, and he and Reser continued to work on the project. It finally broke ground in late 2019, during Doyle's third and final term as mayor.

Doyle, a Democrat, was re-elected for a second term as mayor after gaining 69% of the primary vote in May 2012, and he ran unopposed in 2016 for a third term.

During his time in office, Doyle focused on various environmental initiatives in the city. He worked on adding more solar panels to Beaverton homes, and in 2012, he was awarded the 2012 Mayors' Climate Protection Award.

Doyle was a paid employee of the Westside Metros Soccer Club when he took office. He helped found the nonprofit youth club, which is now the now the Westside Timbers Soccer Club, in 1993.

In 2002, Doyle was arrested in Lincoln City for drunken driving, as reported by The Oregonian/OregonLive.com. The case was dismissed in 2003, and Doyle publicly apologized for the incident during his initial campaign for mayor in 2008.

Editor's note: This story has been updated with more information.


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