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A look at some of the interesting stories that appeared on the pages of the Canby Herald in 2020 - July to December

JULY

New program collects used sports gear, passes it on

With the rising costs of extracurricular activities, Canby Kids, Inc. is doing its part to make sure all kids can play. The nonprofit has announced the launch of a new program called "Pass it On, Canby," which gives community members the chance to do their part too by donating gently-used sports gear at collection bins around town.

The goal of the program, according to a press release from Canby Kids, is to provide kids whose families cannot afford the cost of sports gear a chance to play.

Collection bins were distributed on Monday, June 17 at several area businesses, listed below. Additional bins will be available for temporary placement at special events.

Nearing the goal

All the money hasn't been counted yet, but it looks as though the Relay for Life of South Clackamas County & Woodburn will reach its fund raising goal of $110,000.

The Relay for Life event, which features Canby, Molalla and, this year, Woodburn, seemed to go off pretty well at its new venue at the Wooden Shoe Tulip Farm on Saturday, June 29.

"The tri-city cooperation was amazing," said Sharon Braden, one of the organizers. "This was a bunch of hard workers. Barb Iverson said that she loved the event and it was the easiest one they've ever done.

"Plans are already being made for next year," Braden added.

Where are the animals?

If you celebrated the Fourth of July in Canby by watching the Independence Day Celebration Parade, you might be asking yourself, 'Where were the animals?'

Canby's parade boasted a fairly long parade with more variety than previous years, but notably missing were animals, aside from a dog or two.

Why? Well, that's a mystery.

There's no rule against it, and in fact, organizers worked to attract a variety of entries, including equestrians and other animals, according to Calvin LeSueur, the economic development and tourism coordinator for the City of Canby.

"We were definitely making an extra effort this year to attract all sorts of interesting parade entries, including equestrians—basically anything that is fun…dance teams, things that are more entertaining than just a car or just a person walking," LeSueur said.

Relay for Life 2019.

On the move: Canby Herald building for sale

The listing went live on Monday, July 8. So yes, it's true, Pamplin Media Group is selling the Canby Herald office.

But while physically The Herald will move locations, the newspaper isn't going anywhere.

"It's a corporate decision to downsize the physical locations," said Sandy Storey, Canby Herald manager, "but they still want to keep the community presence, and that is why we are currently looking for a smaller space so that we can still be available to serve the community as we have in the past."

New face in familiar place

Scott McClure is the candidate that City Council members have chosen to take over for Canby's current City Administrator Rick Robinson when he retires at the end of October. He and Brian Latta were the final two chosen to meet residents and staff at a meet and greet on July 11.

It was a long, hard process, according to council members. It took some time to end up with McClure's name, they said. In the end they determined he had an extensive background and a breadth of experience that they wanted working with them. He has been sent a conditional offer and negotiation and background checking continues.

"We are moving forward," said Mayor Brian Hodson. "We've sent the initial offer letter," which probably will include a number of negotiating points from him.

Canby Library to offer 'The Living Room'

Typically, there are few places that LGBTQ teens have been able to drop in and just be themselves. That place now exists in Canby.

Called 'The Living Room,' it is a space for teens, age 14 to 20, to come on one day a week from 4-7:30 p.m. for the next six months—possibly longer if funding continues—at the Canby Public Library. The day will remain private.

The Living Room is the brainchild of Carolyn Russel, whose daughter came out to her recently.

As she did when she first found out, she continues to be involved, helping to provide safe spaces for LGBTQ teens.

AUGUST

Making a strategic move

Canby Farmers Market made a move. Beginning last weekend, Saturday, Aug. 3, the market moved from its downtown Northwest First Avenue location to N. Holly Street between Second and Third Avenues — next to Gwynn's Coffeehouse.

Alexis Purcell, who took over as market manager this year and who also manages the successful Wilsonville Farmers Market, is optimistic about the change.

"We're just looking for a bigger turnout," Purcell said. "We [moved] up to Holly Street…near the park, so hopefully we can focus on moms and kids going to the park and your morning coffee at Gwynn's and some better traffic."

Bed build for the Canby chapter of Sleep in Heavenly Peace.

Digging into summer steam classes

Between the usual summer activities, some Canby kids took the opportunity to engage in summer learning through a special STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) program.

The program, held at Eccles Elementary from July 24 to Aug. 9, brought together incoming fifth-grade students from all over the district, all of whom had applied and even written an essay in order to participate. With 40 kids this year, the program has now doubled in size since its inception in 2016.

Led by district teachers Adam Gingerich, Seth Gingerich and Abbie Perrin, students learned about and built their own computer, learned about and built a programmable robot, learned about and built a solar-powered car, researched and made plans for their STEAM dream (possible career opportunities in the STEAM field), interviewed guest speakers and even took a field trip to DirectLink to learn about the internet and fiber optics (and eat pizza).

Giving kids a better rest

The volunteer organization Sleep in Heavenly Peace bought together about 50 people on Aug. 11 to build beds for children who now sleep on the floor, said Katie Sigler, chapter president.

This time, space to do the work was donated by Millar's Point S Tires and Service. The people, who obviously had a good time, worked for four hours to put together 40 single beds or 20 bunks.

SEPTEMBER

Canby Center gives away hundreds of backpacks

The Canby Center's annual Backpack and School Supply Distribution event was a huge success this year as hundreds of kids in kindergarten through high school received backpacks and supplies for back-to-school.

At the last count, Canby Center's event organizer Kathleen Hanberg said they had collected 350 quality backpacks for the event. But when the day came, and organizers accepted additional people who hadn't preregistered, there was some concern over having enough backpacks appropriate for the older kids.

But it was almost as if the backpacks were multiplying.

"It was kind of loaves and fishes," Hanberg said. "Because at one point we had them carefully set aside. Okay, we want to make sure we have enough of the middle through high school backpacks…so we kept shuffling them over and then we took more people and it became a little bit of a concern. Are we going to have enough of the older kids' backpacks?

Two dead in crash between Canby-Molalla

Two are dead as the result of a two-vehicle collision Friday at South Barnards Road and South Dryland Road in unincorporated Clackamas County between Canby and Molalla.

The report of the crash came on Friday, Sept. 6 at about 4:30 p.m. Serious injuries were reported, according to Clackamas County Sheriff's Office.

When emergency responders from the Sheriff's Office, Molalla Police, Molalla Fire and Canby Fire arrived, they found several citizens in the area helping.

Aurora mayor resigns suddenly

After less than a year as mayor of the city of Aurora, Kris Taylor Sallee resigned her position.

"Due to the escalating lack of communication and cooperation with the City Council and City Staff, I do hereby resign my position as Mayor of Aurora effective immediately," she said in a resignation statement.

The city held a four-minute emergency meeting on Sept. 12, when they accepted the resignation unanimously and began to prepare to declare and advertise the open mayor's position.

Young Life thrives

Nearly 130 Canby kids attended Young Life camps this summer—a big number for a smaller town. Now, leaders are taking that momentum into the school year as they look ahead to regular meetings, special youth events and their big, (much-needed) fundraising dinner.

Young Life is a worldwide organization made up of local groups that pair adult leaders with youth to foster relationships and teach the Christian faith. Young Life reaches high-schoolers and Wyldlife is for the middle-schoolers.

Steam classes.

OCTOBER

Ready for my close-up, Mr. Demille

Canby is starting to get a reputation. Or, more precisely, Canby's annual film festival is starting to find a comfortable voice in the state's filmmaking circles.

The fourth annual Canby Film Fest will be Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Canby Cinema 8 Theater and will feature 14 short films. The festival was the brainchild of the Canby Public Library Foundation as a unique fundraiser.

"We just had this idea where we wanted to do something different in the fundraising arena compared to other local nonprofits," explained Jon Dragt, a foundation board member. "Seeing as how the theater is right next to the library, it seemed like a good match."

Time has proven that assessment correct as the film festival has grown nicely since its inception. Dragt said the hope was to not only fundraise, but also reinforce the notion that the library can be a creative space.

City council says goodbye to Rick Robinson

It was a sad night at Canby's Oct. 2 council meeting as the councilors, the mayor and several staff members said their official goodbyes to City Administrator Rick Robinson. The praise was lavish and several members appeared to be holding back tears.

It won't be the last time the city will see Robinson, there will be an official party on Oct. 9 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Gwynn's. But this was his final official council meeting.

Speaking of economic development

There's plenty of interesting items bubbling close to Canby's smooth, glassy surface, and while Economic Development Director Jamie Stickel can't go into detail on some of them, she's pretty excited about what's happening now – and what's potentially coming in the future.

From an economic development standpoint, Stickel sees Canby at a real turning point.

"I think we're in a really great place in Canby right now," said Stickel. "The economic development department has been working on three different plans that will help to give us a framework for our efforts in the future – the downtown plan, tourism plan, and the preservation plan.

Starting the apology process in Canby

Emotional scars and the pain associated with their military service still run through far too many Vietnam War veterans, something that Canby's Ken Buckles would like to change.

Buckles, the executive director of Remembering America's Heroes, thinks maybe, just maybe, he's come up with an idea that needs doing – a heartfelt apology to the many veterans who came home from Vietnam to less than cheerful receptions. And with that idea in mind, he's created the Vietnam Veterans Apology Cause, which hopes to bring to light the need for a nationwide apology to those veterans, and their families, who were mistreated upon their return from Southeast Asia.

"It is a fact that many, many Vietnam veterans were spit on and called horrible names when returning home, and we as a nation need to apologize," Buckles said. "I have known for decades how horrible many Vietnam veterans were treated when returning home."

Pounding out the hate

Sexism. Gossip. Racism. Hate. Homophobia.

These were just a few of the words spray painted on an old PT Cruiser sitting in the parking lot of Canby High School last week. During the school's "Smash the Hate" campaign, students and staff had the chance to take a whack at the car, and in turn those negative words, for a small fee.

The school's leadership team held the event during lunch throughout last week as a fundraiser, but also in an effort to build an inclusive and positive school climate.

"The symbolism behind this is that we are collecting all those negatives, putting them on the car, smashing the car, then sending the negatives away," said JD Bellum, CHS leadership teacher.

NOVEMBER

Six minors arrested after incident at CHS

On Friday, Oct. 25, while a big crowd was cheering the Canby Football team on to their first victory in more than two years, outside, a moral defeat of sorts was taking place as a fight led to the arrest of two minors on assault charges. Four more were arrested the next week.

Canby Police Chief Bret Smith said Canby Police have worked hard investigating to determine who was involved and what prompted the incident.

It is known that a group of minors apparently targeted one Baker Prairie Middle School seventh-grader outside the football game, per Smith. This occurred on the front lawn of Canby High School, across from McDonalds, police said.

Canby Rodeo court named for 202

Royalty for the 2020 Clackamas County Fair and Canby Rodeo has been chosen.

The 2020 court competed for the royal title on Oct. 26. Five young women were challenged in categories such as rodeo knowledge, appearance, poise, speech presentation, and horsemanship skills. The official coronation of the 2020 court will be held March 7, 2020, in the main pavilion at the Clackamas County Event Center.

This year's queen and court are: Queen Nicole Aydt, princess Marlee James, and princess Alexa Wacker.

DECEMBER

Canby Center hosts Thanksgiving dinner

The Canby Center hosted at least 125 people, probably more, at its second annual Thanksgiving dinner last Tuesday night, essentially doubling the attendance from a year ago. While the center opened at 5 p.m., the line for dinner remained long through 6:30 p.m., with pies and other desserts disappearing as quickly as they were put on the table.

The Canby Center's Executive Director, Ray Keen, spent the day cooking six turkeys and a ham, as well as stuffing, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, gravy, green beans, salad and cranberry sauce. There also were pumpkin pies and other desserts to top with whipped cream.

Lighting up the darkness

The world is a little less bright without Austin Piert in it, and that's why a neighborhood banded together this holiday season to add a little light in his honor.

Piert, who was a Canby High School graduate, Linfield College student and Canby High School baseball coach, was killed in a single-car vehicle crash in February 2019.

The community mourned the loss of someone who they remembered as "always cheerful and smiling."

Now his family members face their first holiday season without that brightness.

"We're just looking for a bigger turnout," Purcell said. "We [moved] up to Holly Street…near the park, so hopefully we can focus on moms and kids going to the park and your morning coffee at Gwynn's and some better traffic."

Digging into summer steam classes

Between the usual summer activities, some Canby kids took the opportunity to engage in summer learning through a special STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) program.

The program, held at Eccles Elementary from July 24 to Aug. 9, brought together incoming fifth-grade students from all over the district, all of whom had applied and even written an essay in order to participate. With 40 kids this year, the program has now doubled in size since its inception in 2016.

Led by district teachers Adam Gingerich, Seth Gingerich and Abbie Perrin, students learned about and built their own computer, learned about and built a programmable robot, learned about and built a solar-powered car, researched and made plans for their STEAM dream (possible career opportunities in the STEAM field), interviewed guest speakers and even took a field trip to DirectLink to learn about the internet and fiber optics (and eat pizza).

Giving kids a better rest

The volunteer organization Sleep in Heavenly Peace bought together about 50 people on Aug. 11 to build beds for children who now sleep on the floor, said Katie Sigler, chapter president.

This time, space to do the work was donated by Millar's Point S Tires and Service. The people, who obviously had a good time, worked for four hours to put together 40 single beds or 20 bunks.


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