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Riley and Canby head coach Jimmy Joyce won a state championship in Beaverton in 1999

PMG PHOTO: DEREK WILEY - Canby quarterbacks coach Faustin Riley, left, and head coach Jimmy Joyce won a state title together at Beaverton in 1999.

When Jimmy Joyce accepted the head football coaching job at Canby High School, there was one assistant coach he knew he wanted on his staff.

Fortunately, that man just happened to be substitute teaching across the hall from Joyce's classroom at Beaverton High School.

"He (Joyce) asked if I'd be interested in helping him if he got a (head coaching) job, and I said sure," Faustin Riley recalls. "If you haven't been a head coach, there's things that you could use a resource about." 

As the head coach at Beaverton from 1991 to 2002, Riley led the Beavers to four league titles and one state championship in 1999.

Joyce, a sophomore, was the starting right tackle on Beaverton's state title team. Joyce then went on to play at Linfield College, but multiple shoulder surgeries shortened his career.

While he finished college, Joyce began commuting back and forth from McMinnville to Beaverton to work with the football team.

"I was at the point where I could sneeze and both shoulders would pop out of socket," Joyce recalls. "I wasn't going to play much. And I always enjoyed the thinking part of the game a little bit more than the physical aspect of the game. I liked the physical, but it was just fun passing along knowledge."

Riley had stepped down from head coach to become the Beavers offensive coordinator after the 2002 season. Joyce started as a freshman assistant and worked his way up to junior varsity offensive coordinator.

"I really fell in love with coaching and learning," Joyce says. "You look back at that coaching staff at Beaverton and there was some pretty good coaches.

On the staff with Joyce and Riley, were Beaverton head coach Bob Boyer and Damien Merrick, who is now the head coach at Sunset.

"There was just an amazing group of coaches that I got to learn from," Joyce says. "I remember coming in for Sunday night meetings and listening to these guys talk football."

Riley accepted the head coaching job at Sunset in 2010 and Joyce went with him. But after one season, Joyce went back to Beaverton to become the varsity offensive coordinator.

"Football wise, he's always been the guy I go to on anything," Joyce says of Riley. "Even when he was at Sunset, we would still talk."

Riley retired from coaching after the 2016 season. But as Joyce began looking at head coaching positions, he knew he wanted his former high school coach on his staff.

"He's forgotten more football than I'll ever know," Joyce says of Riley. "You have this resource that you have to use. Since moving from being a coordinator to a head coach, sometimes the football you have to prioritize down a little bit because you have so many more commitments during the day, so it's nice to know you have somebody there that is fully football."

Riley is Canby's quarterbacks coach, a job he is really enjoying.

"After being out for a couple of years, it's been a lot of fun," Riley says. "They're really good kids. It's a challenge to take kids that are Wing-T quarterbacks and try to convert them to be spread quarterbacks and they've been great about it. This has always been a football community. It's a big challenge, but a great spot. The kids are great. The community cares. We got beat pretty good (against Newberg) and the kids (students) stayed. They stuck around because they wanted to greet the players after the game. You're not going to find that very many places. It's just a good situation."

And Joyce could not imagine doing this without Riley.

"It's meant everything. It's meant the world to have him here," Joyce says. "It's huge. When you have a resource like him, it's an honor to have him here." 


Derek Wiley
Reporter
503-263-6831
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