Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.

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The Samuel Carroll home became a stopping place for freighters on the The Dalles to Canyon City Wagon Road

PHOTO COURTESY OF BOWMAN MUSEUM - Samuel and Margaret Carroll pose for a family photo. Their children became prominent residents in the area.

Samuel Carroll was born in 1820. His parents were Stephen and Sarah French Carroll. Samuel married Margaret Scott, who was born in 1837. They had seven children before moving to Bridge Creek near the Painted Hills. His father, Stephen, also came to Bridge Creek, but his wife remained in Ohio.

Samuel filed a pre-emption claim to establish a homestead along the old The Dalles to Canyon City Wagon Road. While living on the homestead, they had five more children.

The Carroll home was a stopping place for freighters on the wagon road. The Carrolls charged 25 cents per meal and 25 cents per horse for overnight feed. Their place was near the top of the road known as Grade. Samuel was responsible for keeping the road in good condition near his homestead.

They also donated land for the first schoolhouse in the vicinity so their children and those of their nearby neighbors could receive an education. Samuel established the first orchard in the region in 1880. Some of the sheltered valleys provided enough frost-free days so that fruit could grow.

Unfortunately, Bridge Creek had a tendency to flood after severe thunderstorms, and the Carroll homestead was flooded on several occasions. Some members of the Carroll family drowned in one of the floods.

Many of the Carroll children remained in the area and became prominent residents.

Margaret died on Sept. 20, 1896. She was buried in the family cemetery located near their homestead.

Samuel lived on for another 10 years, and he died in 1906. He is also buried in the family cemetery. There is some confusion as one headstone for Margaret states she was the wife of Stephen. She has two grave markers, and the other one correctly states she was the wife of Samuel.


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