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Redemption House Minstries board and staff working together with community partners following death of director

The death of Greg Sanders was devastating for the board and staff of Redemption House Ministries, where he had served as executive director.

Since his sudden passing on Oct. 4, leaders of the homeless ministry have been working together and seeking the help of community partners to keep the shelters and services the nonprofit has provided intact while figuring out leadership of the ministry going forward.

Redemption House currently operates a year-round shelter that houses women and their children and another emergency men's shelter that is open early evening to early morning during the cold weather months.

In the near term, Mike Wilson, the board president, has assumed the role of interim director, as dictated in the Redemption House Ministries bylaws. The board met with staff on Tuesday, Oct. 8, to talk about immediate needs and begin casting a plan of succession.

"It has been a very intense week and a half, grieving the loss of a friend and a colleague, and also at the same time kind of jumping into this role to keep the shelters open," Wilson said last Tuesday.

He went on to note that "a number of community partners were quick to offer their help in a variety of ways" and stressed that board members have stepped forward to help however they can.

"We were able to respond pretty quickly with the help of our community partners," he said. "We have some grant funding lined up and opportunities for more grant funding close at hand."

Wilson added that the Redemption House board has reached out to community partners for leadership ideas.

Who will permanently fill the role that Sanders leaves behind is yet to be determined, Wilson said, though the status of the shelters is currently on stable ground. Not only will they continue to operate the facilities and services as planned, Redemption House Ministries is looking at expanding the women's shelter from four nights a week to seven, and depending on future staffing levels, may return it to full-time hours at some point in the future.


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