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Reid School was named after early teacher and the principal Ruth Reid Overturf

PHOTO COURTESY OF BOWMAN MUSEUM
 - Reid School, located in Bend, is shown in 1915.

This former school is located between Bond Street and Wall Street in south Bend and just one block southeast of the Deschutes County Library. Reid school was built in 1914 and was named for Ruth Reid, an early Bend teacher.

Reid was a native of New Brunswick, Canada. She was born on Jan. 31, 1881. She came to Bend to teach school in 1904 when she was 24 years old. She began teaching in Bend in a one-room school above a feed store. She was paid $60 per month.

When Bend's first modern school was built in 1906, she served as principal. She was paid $90 a month to be a teacher and principal. She soon recognized the need for a high school in Bend and started teaching older students after school in 1904. A new high school was constructed in 1906.

Reid married an early Bend settler, Harrison James Overturf, in 1910 and quit teaching. They moved to Hood River for a while but returned to Bend. After the Reid School was built in 1914, it was named in her honor. One of the contractors constructing the building, George Brosterhous, fell to his death from the third floor. It is said that his ghost haunts the building.

The school was built as a modern education facility that had 10 classrooms, an auditorium, a central heating system and indoor plumbing. It first accommodated students from first grade through eighth grade.

The school remained as a part of the Bend School District until 1979, when ownership was transferred to Deschutes County for use as a local history museum. The building was then renovated, and it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. It was dedicated as the Deschutes Historical Center on July 4, 1980.

Ruth Reid Overturf died on May 13, 1965. Her husband, James Overturf, died on Feb. 6, 1971. Both are buried in Pilot Butte Cemetery in Bend.


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