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Oregon City canyon work will provide more shade and continue to restore streamside habitat.

North Newell Creek restoration work continues for the next few weeks. As reported in the Oregon City News, a Vertol helicopter helped place large wood into Newell Creek to create 36 new logjams. PMG PHOTO: ETHAN M. ROGERS - The Newell Creek Canyon Nature Park restoration project is a partnership with the Greater Oregon City Watershed Council.

The restoration crew, with help from pile drivers and excavators, will now install the logs into the stream bank of Abernethy Creek, creating an additional four logjams. Woody debris, or slash, is placed loosely along the logs. And any disturbed banks will be seeded with a native seed mix or hay. These logjams will create additional spawning and rearing habitat for salmon.PMG PHOTO: ETHAN M. ROGERS - Metro partnered with the Greater Oregon City Watershed Council to arrange for a helicopter to deliver logs to Newell Creek Canyon.

Following the construction of the logjams, over 1,000 native plants will be planted to provide more shade and continue to restore streamside habitat. Trees like grand fir, Western red cedar, and Douglas fir provide shade for the creek and a source of large wood for future logjams. Additionally, native plants are critical to the health of wildlife as sources of food and shelter while sustaining populations of insect pollinators. The forest along the edges of the creek provides shade and cooler water, in turn, providing safe refuge for young salmon and native fish as they grow before migrating to the ocean.COURTESY PHOTO: METRO - Newell Creek Canyon Nature Park trails cross the stream at new bridges constructed with public funding.

The Greater Oregon City Watershed Council was able to support this project by submitting it to the Clackamas Partnership. The Clackamas Partnership is a collaboration of Portland metropolitan area watershed councils, government agencies, tribes and other organizations committed to improving watershed health.PMG PHOTO: ETHAN M. ROGERS - Oregon City's Newell Creek Canyon, a Metro-owned 236-acre park, was paid a visit by a helicopter on July 20.

Projects like the North Newell Creek restoration are part of the work funded to provide healthy watersheds that sustain native fish and wildlife populations, diverse habitats and thriving human communities.

Newell Creek is a special place with some of the best remaining salmon habitat in the Portland metro area. The council acquired a grant from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board to fund this work, which will make a big difference in the overall health of the creek. We are grateful to Metro for managing this project and for their ongoing commitment to Newell Creek Canyon.

Since 2004, the Greater Oregon City Watershed Council is supported by a dedicated corps of volunteer board members who have been working to improve conditions in the watersheds in and around Oregon City. The council's primary goal is to restore a healthy population of native plants and wildlife.

We do this through habitat restoration, which includes invasive species removal, planting native plants, and improving stream structure. We provide technical assistance, education and outreach, working with community partners and stakeholders. We are funded through grants and individual contributions and are only able to carry out this work with the support of the community.

COURTESY PHOTO: METRO
 - Newell Creek Canyon Nature Park's multiuse trail system provides 2.5 miles of walking and hiking paths.

Doug Neeley is chair of the Greater Oregon City Watershed Council. For more information, contact Willow Mikles at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Tom Gaskill at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 503-374-8279.

PMG PHOTO: ETHAN M. ROGERS - Columbia Helicopters, a group experienced in construction, firefighting, logging and stream restoration, lowers a log into Newell Creek Canyon.

Newell Creek Canyon Nature Park

Open: Sunrise to sunset

Where: 485 Warner Milne Road, Oregon City

More: Park residents include beavers, red fox and black-tailed deer, along with pileated woodpeckers and cottontail rabbits. Dogs and other pets are not allowed because they can damage sensitive habitat and threaten wildlife. Stay on the trails. Do not alter any park trails or features. This helps protect sensitive habitat.


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