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Historic site in Eagle Creek will offer demonstrations, farmers market at upcoming event

COURTESY PHOTO - There will be a variety of farming tools at Philip Foster Farms Farming on the Farm Day.

An upcoming event at Philip Foster Farm will highlight historical tools, including a horse hair picker.

During the pioneer era, furniture was often stuffed with horse hair and would periodically need to be re-fluffed, which was done with a horse hair picker. Of the pickers that remain in the United States, one is in the U.S. House of Representatives, and another will be at an event at Philip Foster Farm this Saturday.

The National Historic Site will host its second annual Farming at the Farm Day from 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 17, at 22725 S.E. Eagle Creek Road. During the event, attendees can watch demonstrations with historic farm tools and connect with vendors from the Sandy Farmers Market.

Admission is free, and the afternoon is an opportunity to connect with elements of pioneer life that are different than the ones typically highlighted on the farm.

"It's a great opportunity to talk about pioneer farming and farm tools we have in our collection that haven't been our focus as much," said Philip Foster Farm Programing Director Jennifer Goldman. "We tend to focus on what went on inside the house."

Along with the horse hair pick, additional tools on display will include a corn seed picker, wagon repair tool, hand drill and saw mill.

"It's an 1880s saw mill," said Goldman, noting that they hope to incorporate the machinery into the farm full time once enough grant funding is earned. "Philip Foster had a saw mill on his property."

She added that it's interesting to witness the evolution of the tools.

"The coolest part is seeing how little some things have changed. A hand drill looks like one today, but without a battery pack," Goldman said. "You can still recognize most of the tools, but a few are just completely wacky looking. It's a nice contrast between the two."


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