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Many areas in Clackamas County will see a 3% increase in property taxes, town hall meetings scheduled in coming weeks

With property taxes due Friday, Nov. 15, staff at the Clackamas County Assessment & Taxation Department are giving people the opportunity to plan ahead.

The department will host a series of town hall meetings through Thursday, Nov. 7. The schedule includes events from 7-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 5, at Damascus Community Church, 14251 S.E. Rust Way; 7-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 6, at the Clackamas County Development Services Building, Room 115, 150 Beavercreek Road; and 2-3:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Sandy Senior Center, 38348 Pioneer Boulevard.

Topics at the town halls will include property values, tax changes, senior and disabled citizen property tax deferrals, veteran's exemptions, farm and forestland deferrals, value appeals and the effect of Measure 50 on taxes.

"It's important that citizens understand why they're paying property taxes and all of the benefits the community receives (from those funds)," said Bronson Rueda, deputy assessor for Clackamas County. "People generally don't like paying taxes, but it helps to understand the wide ranging programs

and demographics it supports."

Property taxes in Clackamas County support local school districts, cities, fire districts and the county.

Rueda noted that most areas in the county will see a tax increase of about 3%. Sandy will see a change of 3%, Boring will see a change of 4.25%, Government Camp will see a change of 4.5% and Estacada will see a change of 2.5%.

Clackamas County residents are invited to attend any of the meetings.

"Every meeting is open to anyone who wants to attend. If no meeting fits your schedule, you can call us with any questions. We have people ready at the phone to take those calls," Rueda said.

At the end of each town hall, staff will be available to answer individual questions from attendees.

"We want to be seen as a friendly resource for people to have their questions answered," Rueda said.


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