FONT & AUDIO

MORE STORIES


369 mayors of U.S. cities, including Portland, Gresham, Beaverton and Tigard, write to support the bipartisan bill.

PMG/COURTESY PHOTOS - CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Lacey Beaty of Beaverton, Lucy Vinis of Eugene, Travis Stovall of Gresham, Ted Wheeler of Portland, Sean VanGordon of Springfield and Jason Snider of Tigard are shown here. Six Oregon mayors have all raised their hand in support of a bipartisan infrastructure plan.

Lacey Beaty of Beaverton, Lucy Vinis of Eugene, Travis Stovall of Gresham, Ted Wheeler of Portland, Sean VanGordon of Springfield and Jason Snider of Tigard joined 363 other mayors in a letter from the U.S. Conference of Mayors, urging Congress to "take immediate action" on a bill being pushed by President Joe Biden and a bipartisan group of senators.

"This framework would be the largest long-term investment in our nation's infrastructure and

competitiveness in nearly a century — $1.2 trillion over eight years — to help make our economy more sustainable, resilient, and just," the mayors wrote in the joint letter to congressional leaders Wednesday, July 13.

In the letter, mayors also requested that Congress allow them to be part of the decision-making process when investing the funds in their own communities.

"We call on our federal leaders to continue to empower local decision-makers by investing federal resources to help us build stronger communities and lift up those who have suffered so much during this pandemic — many of whom never fully recovered from the economic meltdown of '08," the letter states.

Beaty called the plan a "historic step" for the nation's future in an emailed statement.

"I am proud to have joined together with a bipartisan group of mayors to urge congressional action on this long overdue investment in our nation's infrastructure," Beaty said. "The Bipartisan Infrastructure Framework is a historic step towards ensuring the future prosperity of America's cities, and it deserves bipartisan support on the Hill.

"By fixing roads and bridges, making critical investments in transit, clean energy, and electrification, replacing lead water pipes, and connecting every American to high-speed internet, this legislation will set up cities and their residents for success."

Despite the apparent bipartisan support, senators on both sides have expressed concerns on how the infrastructure plan will be funded, according to multiple reports.

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican, said on Monday that lawmakers should seek out additional resources for funding.

Sen. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat who chairs the Senate Finance Committee, has proposed raising taxes on corporations. Several Republicans, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, have said raising corporate taxes would be a "red line" for them.


You count on us to stay informed and we depend on you to fund our efforts. Quality local journalism takes time and money. Please support us to protect the future of community journalism.