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A decade later, Rhythm Explosion performed for students in the Estacada School District

ARCHIVE PHOTO - In 1999, Rhythm Explosion performed in the Estacada School District.

1969: The newspaper had teamed up with local businesses to host a coloring contest. "The News and cooperating merchants offer a coloring contest for the young people with three prizes being offered in each of two age groups," an article read. Members of the Estacada Jaycettes would choose the winning submissions.

1979: Items for sale in the newspaper's classified advertisements 40 years ago included a Ford tractor, feeder calves and a vacation home in Mexico.

1989: A curator from the Oregon Historical Society would soon stop by Estacada to access the history of local quilts. "Have you always wanted to have more information about 'grandma's quilt' but didn't know where to go?" The News asked. "Here's your chance, sponsored by the Jackknife-Zion-Horseheaven Historical Society."

1999: A group of performers known as the Rhythm Explosion performed for students at Estacada High School and Estacada Middle School. "(They) provided a concise, brief overview of Ghanaian music from an era preceding European contact through the colonial period and into today's intercultural exchange in the age of technological advancement," The News reported. "The traditional pieces used in the Estacada performances included drums, bells, and the African Xylophone or Giri."

2009: Estacada Relay for Life was hosting a "Survivor Social" as a part of the annual event that raised money for cancer research. "Relay organizers want to hear your story and share your photos to honor your battle," The News reported.

2018: Clackamas County Parks leaders were in the early states of putting together a master plan to chart the next several decades of projects at Barton Park.

Rick Gruen, parks and forest manager for Clackamas County, noted that one goal of the master plan would be to ease the flow of traffic at the park during the summer months.

"Summer recreation blows up Barton, and it blows up Carver," Gruen said. "We want to address that."

Other possible elements of the plan included additional bike and pedestrian pathways, trial connectivity and increased opportunities for camping.


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