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Glencoe High School's newest show 'A Good Farmer' explores the life of undocumented immigrants in a small town.

COURTESY PHOTO - "A Good Farmer' is inspired by a New York Times article about undocumented immigrants in a small town.

Glencoe High School Theatre in Hillsboro is exploring a serious topic discussed across America.

The school's upcoming production, "A Good Farmer," by playwright Sharyn Rothstein, tells the impactful story of two women, Bonnie Johnson and Carla Gutierrez, whose worlds are linked by circumstance, need and a cabbage farm.

More specifically, about U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids in upstate New York in 2006 and the impact it had on the farmers and the workers in the community. This will be the West Coast premiere of the newly published show.

"Anytime you can make people feel and see people in a humane way instead of as just some political topic, then the theater does what it's designed to do, which is to help people think and consider all sides of the story and talk about an issue that is so divisive," said Lori Daliposon, Glencoe High School theater teacher.

The serious nature of the play also has brought up conversations in Daliposon's class. At times, the show directly connects with what some students may be experiencing at home.

"They're just excited and moved that their voices are there, and that what's happening to them, their families and people they're close to, is actually being represented," Daliposon said.

She hopes immigration can be a topic of discussion inside or outside the theater after watching the play. Daliposon's also looking forward to seeing her students shine onstage after several weeks of long work.

"It's always wonderful to see kids create something meaningful and something good because they believe in it," Daliposon said.

Tickets for this performance at 2700 N.W. Glencoe Road, are $7 in advance, or $10 day of the show. The shows begin at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8. Note: Recommended for ages 13 and up due to the serious subject of the show.


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