FONT

MORE STORIES


The new grants wil buy technology-infused learning tools, lab equipment and 40 ukuleles

BY THEYELLOWFELLOW [CC BY-SA 3.0 (HTTPS://CREATIVECOMMONS.ORG/LICENSES/BY-SA/3.0)], FROM WIKIMEDIA COMMONS
BY THEYELLOWFELLOW [CC BY-SA 3.0 (HTTPS://CREATIVECOMMONS.ORG/LICENSES/BY-SA/3.0)], FROM WIKIMEDIA COMMONS - Hogan Cedars Elementary School gets ukes. Budding musicians at Hogan Cedars Elementary School will soon be able to learn music by strumming on 40 shiny new ukuleles, thanks to the latest round of grants to Gresham-Barlow schools from the district's foundation.

"I am absolutely thrilled to receive the GBEF Innovation Grant," said Hogan Cedars music teacher Peter Nilsen-Goodin.

The ukulele project is just one of 14 recently funded by the Gresham-Barlow Education Foundation totaling about $20,000. The grants provide enrichments at every grade level throughout the district.

Several of the grants focus on computer coding and programming for students.

Students at Springwater Trail High School will get LEGO MindStorms robots that they can build, program and command.

North Gresham and Powell Valley elementary schools will learn about collaboration and problem solving with robotic curriculum, the Foundation said. Students will be able to command robots that drive, slither, walk, slam and spin.

Powell Valley teacher Doug Robertson plans to start a LEGO Robotics Club with the new equipment.

Through the years, the foundation has awarded $37,443 to the Gresham High School science department. In the most recent grant cycle, teacher Robert Winters got $1,500 this year to purchase a piece of equipment, a rotating orbital shaker, for his international baccalaureate biology students. Winters has received $13,000 in grants.

The first grade teachers at Kelly Creek Elementary School — Sheri Taylor, Jill Neighorn and Dawn Kemp — received funding for a software subscription called Nearpod, which will benefit every student in first grade at Kelly Creek.

Back at Hogan Cedars, the ukuleles will be used by every student from kindergarten through fifth grade and "will have the opportunity to learn how to play this amazing instrument, broadening their musical horizons while bolstering creativity and imagination, as well as continuing to increase their engagement in school," Nilsen-Goodin said.

Contract Publishing

Go to top
Template by JoomlaShine