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Corbett meets on charter district, October is principal's month and more education news

PMG FILE PHOTO - Corbett School District is working on becoming a charter school district. There is a meeting Oct. 15 to discuss these plans with the public.

Corbett schedules meeting about charter

The Corbett School District will hold a public meeting next week to discuss the process for the entire school district to become a charter district so it can continue to accept out-of-district students.

The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, in the school's multipurpose building, 35800 E. Historic Columbia River Highway.

Almost half the district's 1,200 students come from outside district boundaries. The law that allowed students to transfer between districts expired. If the district converted to a charter district, it could continue to accept kids who don't live within the district's boundaries.

After the meeting, the Corbett School Board will have up to 30 days to approve or deny the proposal to become a charter.

When an out-of-district student comes to another district, the state education funds follow the student. Corbett administration has argued that the out-of-district students are necessary to properly fund the district.

If the district becomes a charter, the publicly elected Corbett School Board will retain governance of the district, set policy and control district size.

FAFSA initiative launched

A statewide initiative designed to help students in Oregon's high school class of 2020 afford and achieve their college and career goals was launched.

The FAFSA/ORSAA Challenge goal is to increase the statewide rate of students completing forms required for federal, state and institutional financial aid — the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and Oregon Student Aid Application (ORSAA) — by five percentage points.

Oregon public high schools are encouraged to join the challenge and high school seniors are encouraged to seek the support of their schools in completing these important financial aid applications.

Oregon is about the middle of the pack on students completing the FAFSA. In 2016, 39% of Oregon's graduating seniors submitted the paperwork, ranking Oregon 26th. By contrast, 62% of Tennessee seniors filed a FAFSA, ranking the state first. Coming in last was Utah, with only 19% of students submitting a FAFSA.

The challenge is being organized by The Higher Education Coordinating Commission, the Oregon Department of Education and others.

Textbook push saved MHCC students more

than $1 million

Students at Mt. Hood Community College saved more than $1 million thanks to the school's textbook affordability drive.

Since 2017, at least 142 faculty members at MHCC have assigned no-cost or low-cost (under $50) textbooks.

Over the last few years, the college has worked on affordable textbook solutions, especially Open Education Resources (OER). OER are free course materials, that can be used online or downloaded just for the cost of printing.

Since 1998, college textbook costs have skyrocketed by 183%, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Some text books can cost hundreds of dollars.

Drag queens read at storytime

A few of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence will read stories celebrating being who you are at a story hour from 1-2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Maggie Mae's Kids Bookshop, 43 N.W. Third St.

The Sisters are a nonprofit group and Maggie Mae's will donate 10% off all sales on Oct. 12 to the Sisters to help them continue to support LGBTQ communities.

A press release from the shop said, "This is a free event, however, we do ask that if you are able to purchase an item while at the shop or do a direct donation to Portland Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence that you consider doing so."

Thank a principal

October is national principals month. Gresham-area school districts are honoring these hardworking women and men.

A study released in September by the Pew Research Center showed public school principals as the most trusted leaders of our nation's most prominent institutions.

Yet, there is high turnover in this high pressure job. One study showed that 1-in-5 principals working in schools in the 2011-12 school year had left their schools by the following year.


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