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William Joseph Fields files to run for City Council, says his conservative ideas are what city needs

COURTESY YOUTUBE - William Joseph Fields speaks to viewers in a recent Youtube video. Voters in Hillsboro will have their say in a crowded race for City Council this fall, after a third candidate filed paperwork to run last week for the council's open Ward 2 position.

William Joseph Fields, 39, filed for the seat on Thursday, Aug. 22. The last day to file for the council was Aug. 27.

In Hillsboro, the city council is divided into three geographic regions. Fields is running in Ward 2, which runs from 10th Avenue along Tualatin Valley Highway and Main Street to Cornelius Pass Road.

Fields will take on two candidates this fall. Incumbent Kyle Allen was first elected in 2015. Allen has said public safety, transportation and affordable housing are his key priorities, if re-elected. A third candidate in the race, John Shepherd, plans to focus on ways to improve city parks and senior services, as well as create areas for low income housing.

Fields, a staunch conservative, said he isn't afraid to let his personal politics be known in the traditionally non-partisan race.

"I'm not going to hide it," he said.

Fields said he is appalled by the treatment President Donald Trump has received since taking office more than a year ago.

"I'm sick of what I'm seeing," Fields said. "Trump is only one man, and despite what everybody says, I believe he's doing a good job."

Fields declined to cite his previous work or education history when he filed for the city council race. According to his Facebook page, Fields is a political activist who "knows the secrets of the Federal Reserve." His Facebook lists his education history as having studied at the "university of Self Education." He attended Hillsboro High School.

If elected, Fields' priorities tend to skew toward state and national issues. He said he'd like to reduce Oregon's "ever expanding debt," among other areas.

"There are a multitude of issues," Fields said. "If I really came out at this time and told you what they were, you wouldn't believe me. People get tarnished all the time, through false narratives and excuses."

Fields did say he would like to repeal the city's "sanctuary city" status, which the council approved in 2017. Allen, who Fields hopes to unseat, voted in favor of the status.

"I have solutions to homelessness, to water issues, to taxation," Fields said. "I have solutions on how to bring solutions to Oregon as whole. I want to help build bridges rather than burn them."

Fields also said he wants to find ways for more people to be involved in their communities.

"If there's a pothole in front of your home and the city is responsible to fix it, why can't we make a petition and get it filled," he said. "We can make it easy — Facebook easy. Then, if it gets 1,000 shares the city will come repave it. That's called leveraging what we have to make it better for others at a lower cost."

Fields said he was once active in the Occupy movement and supported liberal ideologies. He changed his party affiliation to Republican and supported Trump for president in 2016.

"I was raised out here," he said, "but I still go to the Portland drum circle just to throw down phat beats."

Fields said he wants to challenge liberal ideas, if elected. In Hillsboro, registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by more than 7,300.

"You have got to be willing to be offended and to have your ideology challenged," Fields said. "The 'Red Tsunami' is coming."



By Geoff Pursinger
Editor, Hillsboro Tribune
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