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Brought to you by Jonathan Wisniewski - Emergency Veterinary Clinic of Tualatin (EVCOT) - EMERGENCY VETERINARY CLINIC INSIDER -

Jonathan Wisniewski - Emergency Veterinary Clinic of Tualatin (EVCOT) - EMERGENCY VETERINARY CLINIC INSIDERAt Emergency Veterinary Clinic of Tualatin, we see dogs and cats and even ferrets eat all types of things ranging from rocks and socks, to string or other linear material.

Many of these items are not digestible and get stuck in the esophagus, stomach or small intestine.

If the obstruction is caught immediately, often we can get the item out by inducing vomiting in the patient. But, if it has been too long since the ingestion of the item (typically, after the first two to six hours, depending on its size), medical management using pain medications and IV fluids may be needed to help the object pass.

If the item gets stuck, often times we need to remove it surgically. If the item is left for too long, the condition can cause the intestine to rupture or may require removal of a portion of the intestine in surgery.

If you suspect your pet has an intestinal obstruction, don't wait to seek medical attention. The cost of care increases from inducing vomiting, to hospitalization, all the way up to surgery. Some cases can even be fatal if not treated promptly and effectively.

It is best to contact a veterinarian when your pet eats something unusual to see what course of treatment they recommend.

Emergency Veterinary Clinic of Tualatin

8250 SW Tonka St

Tualatin, OR 97052

503-691-7922

www.evcot.com/

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