Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.

FONT

MORE STORIES


Police officers, support personnel nominated by co-workers for hard work in 2019

In an effort to recognize the hard working employees of the Lake Oswego Police Department, an award ceremony is held every year to honor those who've stuck out among their peers.

One citizen and 18 LOPD employees — some received more than one award — were confidentially nominated for their hard work by their peers and supervisors, and they were honored at the 15th annual awards ceremony held at Bullwinkle's Jan. 26.

"It's a great way to recognize all the great work they do," said Police Chief Dale Jorgensen, adding having the awards ceremony outside of work allows the department to build camaraderie in a fun, family-friendly environment.

The award recipients were not only officers, but also support personnel like Lake Oswego Communications Center (LOCOM) and records department employees. COURTESY PHOTO - Officer Rusty Palmeri, left, pictured with Jay Weitman with the LOPD, received the Officer of the Year award.

Officer Rusty Palmeri received the Officer of the Year award and Shift Lead Communications Operator April Benedetti received the Police Support Person of the Year award.

"Both of them are very deserving of the awards," Jorgensen said.

Benedetti has been a shift lead with LOCOM for just over two years, but has been with dispatch for more than 20 years.

"I'm very grateful and honored," said Benedetti, adding that she's received several other awards in the past including the outstanding service and lifesaving awards. "I think that everything that has been accomplished has been a team effort. I would just as much say it's their award as it is mine."

Benedetti was nominated for showing a tremendous commitment to important projects, her drive and for going above and beyond basic requirements.

Similarly, Palmeri was nominated as Officer of the Year for his excellence in police work and dedication, compassion and thoroughness.

Palmeri stood out among the rest in his recent selection as an acting sergeant, his work as a field training officer and member of the Clackamas County Special Weapons and Tactics multi-agency team. COURTESY PHOTO - Shift Lead Communications Operator April Benedetti, left, pictured with Jay Weitman with the LOPD, received the Police Support Person of the Year award.

Similarly, Palmeri was nominated as Officer of the Year for his excellence in police work and dedication, compassion and thoroughness.

Palmeri stood out among the rest in his recent selection as an acting sergeant, his work as a field training officer and member of the Clackamas County Special Weapons and Tactics multi-agency team.

"Those are the three main things I do outside of my normal function as patrol officer," Palmeri said. "It's an honor especially, I think, in an agency like this where we have a lot of hard working, caring, compassionate people, it's an honor."

Palmeri said that he couldn't have done the work he's accomplished without other people and he thanks everyone from the agency for working together.

"I think everyone kind of deserves it (the award) because it's a team," said Palmeri, adding that he plans to continue growing, learning and supporting his co-workers through the knowledge and experience he's obtained in his roles at the LOPD.

There was also a Citizen of the Year award given to Becky Kaelin, a secretary at Lake Oswego High School, who dealt with a man making threats toward the school. She kept him on the phone long enough — and steered the conversation away from violence — so police could gather information and evidence to identify and later locate the suspect.

Other awards included the Chief's Coin, which Jorgensen said he hands out to those who've done a great job. While five Chief's Coins were given to LOPD employees, Jorgensen said he gives them away throughout the year to the general public as well.

"We don't wait until our awards ceremony necessarily to give out Challenge Coins (another name for the coin), we give those out all year long," said Jorgensen, adding that if a citizen performs a good deed, he might give them a Challenge Coin.

Another award that was handed out during the ceremony was for the Top Shooter. Jorgensen said officers go to the shooting range four times a year and participate in different exercises or scenarios and the award is given to the officer who scores the highest. Officers are scored for accuracy, timing and other aspects over the course of the four range visits.

Below is a complete list of award recipients:

Officer of the Year: Officer Rusty Palmeri

Police Support Person of the Year: Shift Lead Communications Operator April Benedetti

Outstanding Service awards: Records Support Kathy Anderson, Detective Jay Slezak, Officer Paul Valesano, Lieutenant Darryl Wrisley, Sergeant Earl Hall

Outstanding Service award Special Unit Commendations: Officer Jeff Oliver, Officer Drew Boggs, Officer Brad Moyle, Communications Operator Brittany Fujii, Communications Operator Kasie Bartol, Senior Communications Operator John Wiggins

Lifesaving awards: Detective Jonithan Funkhouser, Officer Bryan McMahon, Officer Jeff Oliver, Officer Brad Moyle, Officer Erich Mayr, Officer James Macfarlane

Chief's Coins: Communications Operator Brittany Fujii, Detective Jonithan Funkhouser, Detective Jay Slezak, Officer Tony Sparling, Senior Communications Operator John Wiggins

Top Shooter: Detective Jay Slezak

Citizen Recognition award: Becky Kaelin


You count on us to stay informed and we depend on you to fund our efforts. Quality local journalism takes time and money. Please support us to protect the future of community journalism.

Go to top
JSN Time 2 is designed by JoomlaShine.com | powered by JSN Sun Framework