Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.

FONT

MORE STORIES


Beautiful three dimensional paper curling art from the Renaissance taught in library workshop

A lot of people have never heard of quilling. They probably see the word and think it's misspelled for quilting or quiddich. But it's not, it's actually the coiling and shaping of narrow paper strips to create a three-dimensional design. The art is hundreds of years old.

COURTESTY PHOTO - Quilling designs are unique and often colorful.

In fact, according to the web, nuns and monks would roll gold gilded paper trimmed during bookmaking to decorate religious objects as a much less expensive alternative to gold filigree.

During the 18th and 19th centuries, English young ladies would decorate objects with the paper art. It came over to America with the colonists for home decorations, according to the web.

Today, the art is used in a variety of objects from handmade cards to wall-sized museum installations. Items used to make the art include a bamboo skewer or a toothpick or an actual quilling tool, such as a needle tool or slotted tool. Craft stores sell basic tools along with packages of multicolor paper strips. Apparently, this art is not for the impatient or those who lose interest quickly. But practice helps and some people find it creatively satisfying and fun.

On Sept. 18, from 5:30-7 p.m., the Molalla Public Library will offer the basics of quilling at a workshop featuring Jenna Lechner. She is a freelance illustrator and designer from Portland whose illustrations are found on stationery, packaging, wallpaper, advertisements and more. In addition to drawing, she loves paper crafts and has taught classes in Portland for the past eight years. Some of her work can be found on her website, jennalechner.com, or on Instagram at @jennamlechner.

The space at the workshop is limited, so sign up now at the Molalla Public Library.


Carol Rosen
Reporter
503-266-7507
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Quality local journalism takes time and money, which comes, in part, from paying readers. If you enjoy articles like this one, please consider supporting us.
(It costs just a few cents a day.)

Go to top
Template by JoomlaShine