Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.

FONT

MORE STORIES


Wildlife Services examined the horse and determined injuries are consistent with a cougar attack

COURTESY PHOTO: KATLYN STANSFIELD - The horse pictured here with battle wounds lives on Munson Road.

COURTESY PHOTO: KATLYN STANSFIELD - Here, scratch marks can be seen on the back end of the horse.

Update on Sept. 17:

At least one horse survived an attack in the Colton area last week, and an examination of the horse revealed that a cougar is likely responsible.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife received report of the attack, according to Rick Swart, ODFW's public information officer, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Services went out to examine the horse.

"They do believe that the injuries are consistent with a cougar attack," Swart said. "So that's likely what happened."

When there is a confirmed cougar attack resulting in the death of an animal, ODFW is likely to send a team out to set a cougar trap using the carcass of the animal—a method Swart said is usually effective.

However, since there is no carcass in this case, ODFW believes trapping would not be successful. Likewise, ODFW will not deploy dogs to go after the cougar since ODFW is not authorized to cross private property lines to pursue a cougar, even with permission, according to Swart.

Cougars can occupy a 60-square-mile area, so Swart said it is possible the cougar is long gone.

"There are interactions between wildlife and domestic livestock all the time," Swart said. "That's probably what happened, and the animal has probably moved on."

If anyone believes that their animal has been attacked by a cougar, call ODFW's Clackamas office at 971-673-6000.

Original Story on Sept. 14:

At least one horse survived a potential animal attack in the Colton area last week. Although there have been cougar sightings in the area, it is unknown whether a cougar is responsible.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife received report of the alleged attack, according to Rick Swart, ODFW's public information officer, but to his knowledge, they had not received photos and could not confirm whether a cougar was involved.

The Pioneer has since sent photos to ODFW, and once ODFW's wildlife biologists have had a chance to examine them, the agency is expected to report back with analysis.

Swart said the telltale sign of a cougar attack is injury around the neck or jaw of an animal.

"A horse can kill a cougar if it kicks, so cougars are not going to be attacking the rear end of the horse, but they might the neck or the jaw," Swart said. "Dogs can also be responsible for those kinds of injuries."

Cougars tend to attack cats, chickens, goats, llamas and other animals, per Swart. They have been known to attack horses, but that is less common.

When there is a confirmed cougar attack resulting in the death of an animal, ODFW is likely to send a team out to set a cougar trap using the carcass of the animal—a method Swart said is usually effective. However, since there is no carcass in this case, ODFW does not have plans to set any traps.

If anyone believes that their animal has been attacked by a cougar, call ODFW's Clackamas office at 971-673-6000.

Once ODFW reports back on the photos, this story will be updated.


Kristen Wohlers
Reporter
503-263-7512
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Quality local journalism takes time and money, which comes, in part, from paying readers. If you enjoy articles like this one, please consider supporting us.
(It costs just a few cents a day.)

Go to top
Template by JoomlaShine