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75-year-old Pony Butte woman walks 6 miles to mailbox to pick up gift in 1943, finds empty mailbox.

PIONEER LOGO - The Madras Pioneer looks back over the past 100 years.100 YEARS AGO

May 23, 1918

The following letter was received by Mrs. Easton from her husband while on his way to Washington to join the colors:

We have passed a number of fine looking towns in Idaho, but so far, Pendleton is by far the finest looking place.

The country is similar in all respects to Eastern Oregon and Washington, the same basalt buttes and long sagebrush plateaus and flats. We have crossed irrigated districts at intervals and I judge from appearances and some talks I have had with men who are traveling locally that general economic conditions are the same as we are familiar with in Jefferson County.

There are several uniforms on the train, four or five officers and about a dozen men, all fine looking fellows.

We have now reached a region of snow caps again and a lively snowstorm is visible up on some range to the northeast. The present country is better than around Pocatello and I could almost believe myself in the upper Trout Creek country above Ashwood.

As we draw into the main line of the Union Pacific at Granger, the Overland Limited passed just ahead of us. Standing on the observation platform were four officers, two Americans, one either English or Canadian, and the tallest of the crowd, a Frenchman – "The Allies."

The Lincoln Highway is visible frequently as it is nearly parallel with the railroad through Nebraska and Wyoming. It is just a packed dirt affair, although it is well-graded and crowned and rolled.

So far as wheat is concerned, the winter wheat of Jefferson County and also the Pendleton country is farther along in growth than any I have seen until I reached Illinois. Seems about three weeks behind in Nebraska and Iowa.

There are no surface indications proclaiming that the country is at war, except for a few uniforms on all the trains and at the big stations. Twice, we have been sidetracked to let short troop trains pass us going east. Business in the towns, might be classified "as usual." In looking at the boundless resources of the country, one cannot help feeling optimistic as to the outcome of the war. The citizen who would fail to thrill deeply at this country's greatness needs treatment by an "alienist."

75 YEARS AGO

May 20, 1943

Several people in the Ashwood district have written us and asked us to announce "that the meanest sneak thief that ever lived" was in their community this month.

Over Pony Butte way, several miles from a neighbor and 6 miles from their mail box, live Mr. and Mrs. Frank Graham. Feeble in health and past the proverbial three score and 10, a trip to the mailbox is an effort, whether made by horse or afoot.

A son had written that he was sending a Mother's Day present, which would arrive at the mailbox May 8. It was a special gift and arrangements were made so that it would arrive on the day specified.

According to reports which have been verified, the package was left in the mailbox. Mrs. Graham waited until Friday to go after the package, believing it would be safe in the mailbox. The 75-year-old lady walked the 6 miles to find that someone had taken the package. She waited for the return of the mail carrier to be sure the package had been left.

The way back was twice as long and her fatigue was much greater than if she had carried the gift of love from a son far away.

Mrs. Graham was in the back seat of a car a few years ago and was injured when the brakes failed to hold and the car plunged down a hill and upset as Mr. Graham was shutting a gate.

She has never fully recovered from this accident. Neighbors and friends were much incensed that an old lady should be deprived of a Mother's Day gift after walking 12 miles.

50 YEARS AGO

May 23, 1968

Law enforcement officers from the Warm Springs Police Department, the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office and the Madras City Police Department participated last week in the Advanced FBI In-Service Training School at Warm Springs.

The school was in session Monday, May 13, through Thursday, May 16, and concentrated primarily on the legal aspects of search and seizure of persons and motor vehicles, practical application of search for evidence and preservation of evidence. Wednesday and Thursday were devoted to the mechanics of arrest, defensive tactics and firearms.

Ray Shike, security guard at Kah-Nee-Ta Resort, posted the highest score with firearms, with the exception of the head firearms instructor.

The course was sponsored by the Warm Springs Police Department, of which, Capt. John Moss is the chief, in conjunction with the FBI, who furnished the instructors.

According to Richard Montee, head of law enforcement, and juvenile officer at Warm Springs, it is planned to make the school an annual event.

25 YEARS AGO

May 20, 1993

Voters residing in the School District 509-J area Tuesday soundly passed a bond measure to build a new middle school.

A final count of the vote-by-mail ballots showed 57 percent of the 2,783 people voted in favor of the new school project, while 43 percent opposed it. In total, 1,583 voted for the $11.7 million bond issue for the school construction and 1,200 voted against it.

School Superintendent Phil Riley was certainly pleased by the results, tabulated by the Jefferson County Clerk's Office at approximately 8:30 p.m. He credited the effort of people who were not connected to the school district with getting the bond measure passed.

"The nonschool people getting the message across, that was the difference," said Riley. "Fifty-seven percent. That's great."

Riley also credited the fact that committees studied the new school issues for 18 months before the district decided on a proposal to offer the voters.

The bond measure will allow the district to build a new middle school just east of Madras off B Street.

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