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'September 11, 2001: The Day that Changed the World' exhibit includes a series of posters that commemorate the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attack

PHOTO COURTESY OF 9/11 MEMORIAL AND MUSEUM - The Jefferson County Library will host "September 11, 2001: The Day that Changed the World," an educational poster exhibit that commemorates the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attack.

Where were you on that September morning 20 years ago?

Most of us remember exactly where we were and how we felt when we heard the devastating news that our nation had been attacked.

This Saturday, Sept. 11, marks 20 years since the attacks that changed our world forever.

"We suffered a great tragedy that day and for the weeks and months that followed. We mourned the victims of the attacks and promised to never forget," said 9/11 Memorial and Museum Board Chairman Michael R. Bloomberg.

A photo exhibit, "September 11, 2001: The Day that Changed the World," will be at the Jefferson County Library Tuesday, Sept. 7 through Saturday, Sept. 11. The 9/11 Memorial and Museum and the National Endowment for the Humanities have created and shared the downloadable educational exhibition with libraries and schools across the county.

The exhibit recounts the events of Sept. 11, 2001, through the personal stories of those who witnessed and survived the attacks. Told across 14 posters, this exhibition includes archival photographs and images of artifacts from the 9/11 Memorial and Museum's permanent collection.

It presents the history of 9/11, its origins, and its ongoing implications. It explores the consequences of terrorism on individual lives and communities at the local, national, and international levels, and encourages critical thinking about the legacies of 9/11.

"It was offered to us through the National Endowment for the Humanities and from the 9/11 Memorial and Museum," said Jefferson County Library Community Services Librarian Gretchen Schlie. "I thought this would be a really good thing to be able to do."

She has been wanting to add exhibits to the library's offerings.

"I want to put this out so that people can remember because it is the 20th anniversary," Schlie said.

Schlie printed and laminated the 14 posters, which will be displayed on the end of the shelving units in the adult section of the library. Visitors are welcome to view the posters during regular library hours, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sept. 7-11.

The National September 11 Memorial and Museum located at the World Trade Center in New York City is leading the nation in commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks that took the lives of 2,977 men, women and children in New York City, Arlington, Virginia, and near Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

Located on 8 of the 16 acres of the World Trade Center site, the Memorial and Museum remember and honor the people who were killed in the attacks. The memorial plaza design consists of two reflecting pools formed in the footprints of the original Twin Towers and displays personal and monumental objects.

The curated exhibit is just one of the events the museum has planned to commemorate the 20th anniversary.

"Twenty years after the attacks, with terrorism still a threat today, the events of 9/11 and its aftermath remind us that we may never be able to prevent all the actions of people intent on harming others, but we do have control over how we respond to such events," a museum press release says. "Whether by volunteering in our local communities, serving our nation in the military, caring for the sick, or through other efforts, all of us can help build the world in which we want to live. As we witness history unfolding in our own time, the ways we choose to respond—both large and small—can demonstrate the best of human nature after even the worst of days."

"September 11, 2001: The Day that Changed the World" exhibit

10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, Sept. 7-11

Jefferson County Library, 241 SE Seventh St., Madras


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