Support Local Journalism!        

Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.


FONT & AUDIO

MORE STORIES


Named for its location on the southeastern slopes of the region of the same name

PHOTO COURTESY OF BOWMAN MUSEUM - The Blizzzard Ridge School and its students are shown in 1912

This school site was located about seven miles south of Ashwood and near Clover Creek. It was first built in 1904, and was known as Huston School, as it was on the land owned by Wade Huston. An older school was also near Blizzard Ridge and was known as Old Blizzard Ridge School.

The Blizzard Ridge School was a one-room school building of rough wooden construction. It had four long, handmade tables and benches for pupils. The teacher had a desk along a back wall in front of the only blackboard. The blackboard was a three-foot by 10-foot board that was painted black. Five pupils attended the first class, and the first teacher was Lottie Montgomery.

The school became known as Blizzard Ridge School because of its location on the southeastern slopes of the region known as Blizzard Ridge. According to Lewis McArthur, in "Oregon Geographic Names," John O'Kelly, a local rancher, named the ridge in 1900. Mr. O'Kelly was headed from Ashwood to his home on a winter day when a severe snowstorm forced him to return to Ashwood.

Ellen Telfer taught school in the area in 1912, and the school was in need of much repair, so she taught at the Kibbee Place. She was hired to teach for three months—July, August, and September — and was paid $45 a month, and she paid $10 per month for room and board at a nearby homestead. The school was operational for about 10 years. A new schoolhouse was built in 1914, and the district was known as Fairview.


You count on us to stay informed and we depend on you to fund our efforts. Quality local journalism takes time and money. Please support us to protect the future of community journalism.


Have a thought or opinion on the news of the day? Get on your soapbox and share your opinions with the world. Send us a Letter to the Editor!

Go to top