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Other aspects play a role in mass shootings, but there's only one common element in all of them: military-grade assault weapons

Welcome to our tragic American summer. California, Texas, Ohio. Just the latest locations of mass shootings perpetrated by deranged, young, white males. The beat goes on. It's on a loop. More intense media coverage, more "thoughts and prayers" from political officials, more blame.

Yet, has there been any real movement one way or the other on how to combat this insane reality of American mass shootings? Is anyone's opinion on it changing? Are Republican and Democrats calling each other, saying, "We have to figure this out"? No.

Undoubtedly, every insane episode of mass killing gun violence puts stronger light on the GOP and its gun control stance — which is essentially don't let it happen.

This week, I've heard several national Republican leaders, including President Trump, push forward with a mantra of video games, violent culture and inadequate mental health service as the core element of the problem. For sure, it all plays a role. But the common sense response to that is simple: Aren't there mental health issues and video games in other countries?

And say our nation invests billions expanding mental health. Will suddenly all the deranged, angry, hate-filled young men start making therapy appointments? No.

The tangible, in-your-face, obvious connection with these American-made mass shooting — assault-style, large-magazine weapons.

Assault weapons are not for hunting unless you're hunting a mass number of people. They are a military weapon that should not be available to the masses.

I respect and support most gun rights activists' positions, but when it comes to assault weapons, they lose me. Hunting weapons, guns to protect a household, those are worth fighting for. I don't understand the determination of the gun-rights activists who equate the right to own a weapon of mass and fast destruction with owning a handgun or .22.

I know there are gun-lovers who enjoy firing assault-style weapons, and I understand that. I wouldn't want to hinder anyone's legal fun that doesn't hurt anyone else.

But here in 2019, the danger to society assault-style weapons represent overwhelms the law-abiding citizens' right to have fun with them. Finding a way to end, or substantially curtail, this tragic, American stain must address access to assault-style guns.

But does the political will and grace exist? No. Not yet.


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