Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.

FONT

MORE STORIES


Prepare your body and prevent athletic summer injuries for the upcoming sports season.

STEELE HAUGEN - According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, around 30 million children and adolescents in the U.S. participate in youth sports. Just the high school-aged students within that group account for around 2 million injuries and 500,000 doctor visits each year. Of those under 14, 3.5 million receive medical treatment for sports injuries.
As student-athletes train over the summer, preparing to head back to the practice fields later this season, injuries are going to happen.

Despite concerted efforts to reduce and prevent sports injuries, Bend physical therapist Chris Cooper pointed out that it's impossible to eliminate them from sports.

So, in order to ensure injuries are diagnosed and treated quickly, before they worsen, Cooper said it is paramount parents and guardians are able to quickly identify the signs of possible injury — ailments that aren't always obvious during practice or competition, but which may manifest later on at home.

"Whether it's because they're concerned about playing time or feel they can tough it out, student-athletes won't always admit when they're hurt or injured," said Cooper, staff PT at Therapeutic Associates Physical Therapy - Athletic Club of Bend. "But even when a youth or teen is convinced it's not that bad, that they can walk it off, etc., he or she could still be doing themselves harm by not getting treatment as soon as possible."

That is when it's important for a parent or guardian to get involved, he said.

"By just knowing some of the obvious signs that a young athlete isn't just sore, but is actually injured, parents can play an active role in ensuring injuries are diagnosed and treated as soon as possible, preventing further damage from occurring," said Cooper.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, around 30 million children and adolescents in the U.S. participate in youth sports. Just the high school-aged students within that group account for around 2 million injuries and 500,000 doctor visits each year. Of those under 14, 3.5 million receive medical treatment for sports injuries.

"'No pain, no gain' doesn't apply to youth sports, and there should be no such thing as 'toughing it out,'" Cooper said. "If your child or teen is showing any of these signs, it's important you get them evaluated as soon as you can."

In many cases, visiting a physical therapist can be an ideal starting point for such evaluations. Physical therapists are trained to provide sports injury assessments for athletes of all ages.


Quality local journalism takes time and money, which comes, in part, from paying readers. If you enjoy articles like this one, please consider supporting us.
(It costs just a few cents a day.)

Go to top
Template by JoomlaShine