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Process slowed by descrepancy between two maps as to where property ends behind the structure

GRAPHIC FILE PHOTO - Newberg Animal Shelter Friends' effort to purchase the building from the city of Newberg is slowly continuing, board member Rick Lapinski told the Newberg City Council on May 7, with the advent of a new development that could delay the negotiations even further.

Newberg Animal Shelter Friends' effort to purchase the building from the city of Newberg is slowly continuing, board member Rick Lapinski told the Newberg City Council on May 7, with the advent of a new development that could delay the negotiations even further.

Lapinski revealed that the boundary line on the appraisal for the property on Sandoz Road is significantly different from the blueprint filed with the city in April 2011.

"We've been in negotiations for three or four weeks," Lapinski told the council. "We started out and we each made some concessions and now we are trying to work through where the building actually sits on the property. Let me say bad on me for not realizing the discrepancy in the property line shown on the appraisal. We all assumed that the appraisal was done using the map that the city has on file rather than an arbitrary line drawn in an aerial picture of the animal shelter."

The original blueprint includes 50 feet of land beyond the fence line along the west side of the property, but the appraisal plan excludes that 50 feet and runs up to the fence. The problem is that the original blueprint reflects room for growth of the shelter, allowing more kennels to be installed as the need increases.

"Some of you may or may not know that the back one third of the building was not constructed as planned due to budget constraints," Lapinski explained. "This back third of the building consisted of more dog kennels and storage areas (in the plan). When we began excavation for the building it was discovered that a layer of soil would have to be removed because it was not structurally sufficient to support a building."

As a result, the group decided to excavate as if they were going to build the whole building, which would make way for an easy expansion and save on the extra expense when the time came.

"We were trying to save money and do the right thing at the time" Lapinski said.

The shelter was designed specifically to place the kennels on the west side of the building so as to reduce the impact of barking dogs for Sandoz Road residents.

"Let me just quote from the animal shelter concept plan … and this goes back to 2009," Lapinski said. "'The facility is to be designed to reduce or mitigate animal noise where practical. Initially it is planned to have landscaping and a parking area in between the building and Sandoz Road with the building front to be 100 feet back from the property line.'"

The parking lot was not constructed because of budget constraints at the time. That could be a future hurdle for the animal shelter when they approach the city for permits to expand; the city will want to know where additional parking will be located.

As a result, the only possible area for future kennel expansion is along the west side at the back of the building and this is why the extra 50 feet is important for the shelter as a part of the purchase.

"We are asking for no additional property, only the property that was originally intended to go with the animal shelter as shown on the site plan that is currently on file and was accepted by all parties when constructed," Lapinski said.

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