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The Tribune will update this story as things change in the arts, entertainment and activity worlds; RACC updates woeful artist numbers, Oregon Historical Society shares citizen comments and Oregon Zoo brings animals into living rooms (with video)

COURTESY PHOTO: OREGON ZOO - Because it's closed, the Oregon Zoo is posting live videos of animals doing their thing each week, including sea otters.Keeping up to date on our arts, entertainment and activity worlds as we battle the health and economic effects of the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic:

• The Regional Arts & Culture Council has surveyed the state's artists and arts organization about their financial status during the current health and economic crisis, and it's not a pretty picture.

Updated numbers from RACC show that respondents are reporting a combined $56 million in projected lost revenue through May.

Reported losses include revenues from lost contracts, shows and teaching work that have all been cancelled in order to comply with restrictions on group sizes, gatherings and requirements for social distancing.

RACC has collected more than 1,200 responses from individuals and more than 260 arts organizations across 25 counties; Multnomah County-based artists provided the bulk of the date with 900 respondents reporting a total of $46 million in losses for the second quarter.

"Thank you to the people who took the time to respond to the survey," said Madison Cario, RACC executive director. "They have collectively confirmed that many individuals and organizations working in arts and culture lack sufficient infrastructure and resources to sustain continued financial and social disruptions."

RACC has been working with a consortium of funders, including Oregon Community Foundation and Miller Foundation, to establish a pool fund for arts organizations and artists.

For more: www.racc.org.

• The Oregon Historical Society's personal reflections project, in which citizens submit stories about how the current health and economic crisis changed their lives, has received dozens of entries, so far.

"It's pretty powerful to see how people are being very raw through this process," said Kerry Tymchuk, OHS executive director.

There have been more than 50 submissions, via an online form and by simply writing a handwritten note to OHS, 1200 S.W. Park Ave., Portland, 97205.

Some submissions will be added to the OHS Research Library.

The reflections respond to such questions as: In a period of isolation from family and friends, what stories of Oregonians from the past or present give you courage? What is a normal day for you? What have you learned about yourself, family and friends?

Tymchuk shared some of the content, via email:

"Students talking about missing their final days of high school and potentially missing prom. ... Parents trying to figure out how to juggle working from home while raising their kids with schools closed. ... Folks talking about sewing masks to help with the shortage of PPE for healthcare workers. ... People talking about how strange it is to go shopping and see the bare shelves (and the hunt for toilet paper — lots of talk of toilet paper!)."

For more: www.ohs.org.

• The IndyCar Series' Grand Prix of Portland, originally set for Sept. 4-6, has been moved to one week later, Sept. 11-13, at Portland International Raceway.

The move opens up the IndyCar summer schedule to move the Indy 500 to Aug. 23, from its traditional Memorial Day date. The rescheduled Portland date is subject to ongoing guidance and mandates of national, state and local authorities regarding public gatherings.

For more: www.portlandgp.com.

• The Northwest World Reggae Festival, a staple on the Oregon summer concert schedule, is sticking with its July 24-26 dates at Mystic Rhythms Ranch near Redland (outside Oregon City) in Clackamas County.

"We will keep going with our date until such a time that we have to move the date to a later time," a NWRF statement said. "We have talked with our performers and they have all confirmed that they will be able to change with us as needed."

For more, see the event's Facebook page, www.facebook.com/NorthWestWorldReggaeFestival.com.

• The Oregon Zoo will remain closed until April 28 (at least), but it's posting live videos of animals on its Facebook page and YouTube, and writing about at-home ideas to learn more about animals and how to help them on its website, www.oregonzoo.org, as well on its social media.

Some animals highlighted: Pinecone the western screen owl; Humboldt penguins; Lincoln the sea otter.

• Alberta Rose Theatre is streaming some 20 concerts, through Sunday, on its website, www.albertarosetheatre.com.

• Some ways to help restaurants and restaurant workers, via Barb Randall from the Lake Oswego Review:

Restaurant Workers' Community Fund, which works across a number of labor issues in the restaurant industry, has launched the RWCF Covid-19 Emergency Relief Fund. The fund collects donations to provide relief to individual workers affected by coronavirus and to create zero-interest loans to businesses.

Visit www.restaurantworkerscf.org/ to learn more and donate.

One Fair Wage, a nonprofit advocating against sub-minimum wage laws for tipped restaurant workers, launched the OFW Emergency Fund. The target $213,000 (based on the federal tipped minimum wage of $2.13 per hour) will provide immediate cash assistance to restaurant employees, delivery workers and other tipped workers in the food industry. Eater.com said demand from restaurants was already surging last week. Sally Kohn, a representative for OFW told Eater. "We've received about six more times the number of requests as we've received donations. The crisis is huge."

Learn more online at onefairwage.com.

The United States Bartenders Guild is helping bartenders affected by the virus through its emergency assistance program. The guild is getting help from Jameson Irish Whiskey, who has pledged $500,000 toward the effort.

Visit www.usbgfoundation.org/covid-19-response.

• The Travel Channel's "Portals to Hell" show will feature the Portland's Shanghai Tunnels, a series of underground passageways used for transport of goods (and purportedly sailors) in Old Town Chinatown in the 19th century. It'll air at 10 p.m. Friday, March 27.


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