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Other items include Carnation Contemporary, Stephanie Chefas Project openings and Portland Open Studios.

COURTESY PHOTO: OJMCHE - Mending the Social Fabric exhibit by Bonnie Metzler entails people sewing messages on fabric and the messages mended to and encircling a large parachute.The Tribune will highlight some gallery openings and other arts happenings in the first edition of each month, coinciding with First Thursday this month on Oct. 6. Galleries have reopened, but they may have limited hours and/or online presentations and visitor restrictions. Please check individual websites for info on those you plan to visit.

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at Portland State University has a new exhibit, "Louise Bourgeois: What is the Shape of This Problem," through Dec. 4. It's from the collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation.

The exhibit includes 119 works focusing on prints, textiles and a series of eight holograms, ranging from the 1940s to the early 2000s. It examines the emotional terrains found in her practice, including her feelings of isolation, anger and fear, depicted through images of the body, childhood, family, architecture and the passage of time.

For more: www.pdx.edu/museum-of-art.

Carnation Contemporary, 8371 N. Interstate Ave, features: A group exhibition "Nobody's Fool" (a title borrowed from poem Resolution #1003 by June Jordan) that captures overlapping and divergent articulations of Black alternative realities (curated by Ella Ray), Oct. 23-Nov. 7; and "Waiting for the Flood" by Maria Lux, who continues her work on de-extinction, through Oct.17. For more: www.carnationcontemporary.com.

• At Stephanie Chefas Projects, 305 S.E. Third Ave., it's Lisa Congdon's "North Coast" paintings, in which she chronicles her love for the coast in an exploration of colors, flora and fauna, foods, rural heritage and landscapes; also, Jackie Brown's paintings in "Island Style" are inspired by small things in life that bring joy, such as fruits, animal prints, vintage cars and positive messaging. Both show Oct. 6-Nov. 9. For more: www.stephaniechefas.com.

• At Elizabeth Leach Gallery, 417 N.W. Ninth Ave., it's "Re:place," a vibrantly evocative series of landscape paintings by Stephen Hayes, and "Apprehension of Beauty" abstract paintings by Gregg Renfrow, Oct. 7-30. For more: www.elizabethleach.com.

COURTESY PHOTO: OJMCHE - It is a 314-foot circumference parachute in the Bonnie Metzler exhibit.• Lawrence Halprin's "Fountains" at Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education has been extended through Nov. 27. And the museum at 724 N.W. Davis St. has a new and interesting exhibition opening Oct. 7 and showing through Jan. 30.

It's "Mending the Social Fabric" by Bonnie Meltzer, who creates a site-specific installation made up of a 314-foot circumference parachute with 75 embroidered handkerchiefs with text that amplifies embedded themes circling the parachute.

COURTESY PHOTO: OJMCHE - Mending the Social Fabric includes messages of all kinds.It's guided by the Jewish principle "tikkun slam," which means "repair the world." It emphasizes citizen action, voting rights and immigration, as well as COVID-19, social justice and safety nets.

"This interactive fabric installation is not one giant kvetch about the unraveling of the social fabric; instead, it embraces action, hope and healing," Meltzer said. "I believe people are the warp of the social fabric and our actions are the weft threads that turn it into cloth. The very act of gathering together as a community to sew on a giant parachute will help mend the isolation and pain so many have felt in the last year."

For more: www.ojmche.org.

• Russo Lee Gallery, 805 N.W. 21st Ave., presents "Passage" by Michael Brophy, paintings inspired by the artist's exploration of the Pacific Northwest, as well as "Damascus: Mapping Place, Home, & Exile," paintings that reference mapping, current/historical events, borders and human activity by Audrey Tulimiero Welch. Both show Oct. 7-30. For more: www.russoleegallery.com.

• After being virtual last year, Portland Open Studios, featuring artists and their workspaces, takes place as an in-person event Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 9-10 and Oct. 16-17, each day from 10 a.m-5 p.m. There'll be nearly 90 artists taking part. The contactless tour guide is available at www.portlandopenstudios.com.

"We are excited to be back in person this year," said Kirista Trask, Open Studios president. "Last year's live online event was good, but there is nothing like being able to visit an art studio in person."

Workshop St. Johns in Cathedral Park and Portland Child Art Studio in Northwest Portland will be housing artists who have lost their studios — a big problem, organizers say — or who don't have proper studio space to show.

Reminder: Portland Art Museum, 1219 S.W. Park Ave., offers free admission on First Thursday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., www.portlandartmuseum.org.

For information on galleries: First Thursday, www.firstthursdayportland.com; Portland Art Dealers Association, www.padaoregon.org.

— Jason Vondersmith


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