FONT & AUDIO

MORE STORIES


Other items include Rose City Rollers, 'Beyond Van Gogh,' Philip Cuomo, Devan Long

COURTESY PHOTO - Could a Grammy Award be in Aaron Nigel Smith's future?Grammy nomination

Portland's Aaron Nigel Smith, a musician and educator, has been nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Children's Music Album for his collaborative album "All One Tribe," which he made through his Aya World Productions label.

The 25-track project by 1 Tribe Collective is distributed by the Tuff Gong International label, formed by the late Bob Marley. It celebrates the rich culture and diversity that Black voices bring to family music.

COURTESY IMAGE - The album All One Tribe, led by Aaron Nigel Smith, was a collaboration of diverse Black voices.It features 24 family music artists from across the country.

"The 1 Tribe Collective and this album are historic. This project represents the dreams and hopes of our people. It's an incredible honor to work with so many voices representing the rich diversity of Black and brown artists," Smith said.

Smith and his fellow artists in the 1 Tribe Collective will attend the Grammy celebrations in Los Angeles on Jan. 31. The children's category winner will be announced at a ceremony prior to the telecast on CBS that evening. The pretelecast awards show will stream on www.Grammy.com.

Return to rollin'

The Rose City Rollers, Portland's preeminent roller derby club, will return to action at The Hangar at Oaks Amusement Park with bouts starting at 4:30 p.m. Dec. 18 — 652 days after they closed the doors because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The club hopes to put on a full season of roller derby in 2022.

Prior to the pandemic, the Rose City Rollers sported 17 programs with 500 skaters and 800 volunteers.

'Beyond Van Gogh'

The exhibit "Beyond Van Vogh: The Immersive Experience" at Oregon Convention Center has been extended through Feb. 12 because of high demand.

For tickets: www.vangoghportland.com.

COURTESY PHOTO - PHILIP CUOMOCuomo passes

Last week we wrote about Artistic Director Philip Cuomo, who was prevented from working anymore for CoHo Productions because of "an aggressive medical condition."

Cuomo died Nov. 27. Isaac Lamb, Cuomo's nephew and godson, as well as an actor and director, had set up a GoFundMe site to help Cuomo's wife, Maureen, financially.

From CoHo:

"Philip fell in love with CoHo's mission when he came to Portland in 2003, first joining the company as a co-producer when he brought a play to the mainstage 2012 season. Philip joined CoHo as our producing artistic director one year later, working diligently with The Miller Foundation and our Board of Directors to give CoHo new life, outlining a plan for our little blackbox that would pave the way for successful future seasons. It was Philip's vision for CoHo to create a physical space where new and emerging artists could create art, find joy, and call home.

"A magnetic, vivacious human being, Philip developed many of the programs and concepts that are still foundational to how CoHo operates today. Philip gave birth to CoHo Lab, our incubator program that fosters new artists, helping them develop their latest works in a professional setting and giving them a stage to practice their craft. Philip introduced CoHo to the idea of Radical Listening, a way in which we can use our ears and our senses to connect intimately with the world around us. …

"Philip Cuomo created a better world, everywhere he went. Described by his community as "The King of the Clowns," Philip was a beacon of positivity, whose kindness, sense of whimsy, mischievous nature, playful spirit, fierce wit, ferocious talent, and huge heart touched the lives of everyone whose path he crossed.

"Philip was deeply loved by us all, which is a sign of a life truly well-lived. His legacy lives on here at CoHo, so while our hearts quietly break, we know there's still good work left to do. May we honor his spirit with compassion, tenacity, humor, and kindness. May we honor his memory by making a commitment to "stop — and find joy."

Long acting

College football fans might recognize the big man playing Thorfinn on the CBS show "Ghosts."

It's Devan Long, a former defensive end for the Oregon Ducks (2001-05), who moved to Hollywood after his football career. He has appeared in several commercials and television shows, but Thorfinn could be his biggest role. In a show about ghosts in a house, Thorfinn is a Viking from 1009.

"Ghosts" airs at 9 p.m. Thursdays.

Long is from Anacortes, Washington. He told the Seattle Times: "Up until now, Hollywood has said my face does not look funny. Or if it does look funny, you don't say funny things. So I've been an ex-Navy SEAL, a bouncer, big daddies, which is cool. I've always had fun with that. But I love making people laugh. When I played football, my best memories in football came out of the locker room and cracking jokes. So comedies were always where I wanted to end up, but when you're a big guy with a big, Cro-Magnon forehead and a beard, Hollywood's like, 'Yeah, we've got other ideas for you.'"

Here's his IMDB page: www.imdb.com/name/nm4231435. And, for the full Seattle Times story, see: www.seattletimes.com/entertainment/tv/how-anacortes-devan-chandler-long-segued-from-football-to-acting-in-cbs-ghosts.

COURTESY IMAGE - TidalWave Comics is featuring pop star Tina Turner in a comic.Turner comic

Portland's TidalWave Comics has produced a comic focused on pop singer Tina Turner in its "Female Force" series. It was released recently during the same week that Turner turned 82.

It's available via hard copy or on digital format. See www.tidalwavecomics.com.


You count on us to stay informed and we depend on you to fund our efforts. Quality local journalism takes time and money. Please support us to protect the future of community journalism.