Link to Owner Dr. Robert B. Pamplin Jr.

FONT

MORE STORIES


Zoo officials say the logs will promote exercise and encourage natural behaviors among Portland's Asian elephant family.


COURTESY PHOTO: KATHY STREET/OREGON ZOO. - Asian elephant Lily climbs atop a 30-foot log at the Oregon Zoo that was donated by the World Forestry Center.
Elephants at the Oregon Zoo got some new toys this week, thanks to a makeover for the World Forestry Center’s outdoor locomotive exhibit.

Early Tuesday, Nov. 15, a crew from Stimson Lumber Co. lifted five 30-foot-long Douglas-fir logs from the forestry center’s Peggy the Train display, and shipped the logs a few hundred fee downhill to the zoo’s new Elephant Lands habitat. The logs will be the elephants’ new playthings and exercise equipment.

Zoo officials say the logs will promote exercise and encourage natural behaviors among Portland’s Asian elephant family. “They’ll give the elephants new surfaces to scratch on, push against and climb over,” said Shawn Finnell, the zoo’s senior elephant keeper. “Lily especially is an active climber, and I expect her to be all over them.”

COURTESY PHOTO: KATHY STREET/OREGON ZOO
 - Rose-Tu investigatse new logs that were donated to the Oregon Zoo's Elephant Lands habitat. The World Forestry Center gave the zoo five large Douglas-fir logs as it renovate its outdoor locomotive display. COURTESY PHOTO: KATHY STREET/OREGON ZOO - A crew from Stimson Lumber Co. lifts five 30-foot Douglas-fir logs from the World Forestry Center's Peggy the Train exhibit this week. The logs that had been on display for 15 years were doanted to the Oregon Zoo's Elephant Lands habitat.The World Forestry Center is updating and renovating several of its outdoor areas and needed to replace the logs, which had been on display for 15 years. New logs will be added to the display of the 1909 Lima Shay-geared, 42-ton locomotive that hauled an estimated billion feet of logs in its lifetime.

Peggy worked in the forests of Washington and Oregon, survived the Tillamook Burn and retired in 1950. In the early 1970s, after a life on temporary display or in storage, Peggy was moved to a permanent display outside the forestry center, off Southwest Canyon Road near the zoo.

“The World Forestry Center staff is thrilled to see our big logs go to a happy home,” said Eric Vines, the forestry center’s executive director.



Go to top
Template by JoomlaShine