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The influential tastemaker published many national and local authors from its Slabtown HQ.

(Image is Clickable Link) COURTESY TIN HOUSE - A recent Tin House Magazine cover published in spring 2018. Another print publication has turned its final page.

Tin House Magazine, an influential tastemaker for writing and poetry on both coasts, will cease publication after printing its 20th anniversary issue in June, 2019.

The literary journal published the biggest names in the written world — including Stephen King, Cheryl Strayed and Margaret Atwood — from its Slabtown headquarters located at 2601 N.W. Thurman St. in Portland.

It also highlighted local luminaries such as Leni Zumas, Ursula K. Le Guin and Lidia Yuknavitch.

"Tin House supported me as a young writer, and the work it published defied boundaries and influenced what I believed possible on the page," noted Benjamin Percy, an Oregon-born horror author.

In a statement, Tin House publisher and editor-in-chief Win McCormack said the resources dedicated to producing the magazine would be diverted to its book publishing business and hosting writing workshops, which will now offer more scholarships. He said the Tinhouse.com website will continue to publish original fiction, nonfiction and poetry.

"From our authors to our readers, I'm honored to have had the support of a remarkable literary community and look forward to continuing those relationships in the years to come," he said. "It has been a remarkable run."

Tin House Magazine began publishing in 1999. Its first issue included a piece by David Foster Wallace, according to an interview with the Portland Tribune. The company later expanded to New York City, making it a rare East Coast crossover in the Rose City literary firmament.

The magazine was praised for making a course correction to publish equal numbers of women and men after VIDA: Women in Literary Arts discovered a large gender disparity in 2010.

"Twenty years feels like the right time to be stepping away and moving on to new adventures," said Tin House editor Rob Spillman. "I look forward to focusing on other opportunities at the intersection of art and activism."

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