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Sean Riddell says he's 'doing just fine' after vandals targeted his Northeast Portland firm.

COURTESY PHOTOS - The aftermath of the water damage to Sean Riddell's northeast Portland law office is shown here. Portland Police are still investigating the case of a prominent Portland attorney whose offices were flooded after he provided legal services to a union for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement employees.

Sean J. Riddell's northeast Portland law firm was flooded sometime between Friday, April 26 through Sunday, April 28 of this year. Vandals threaded his own garden hose through the front door mail slot — and let the water flow.

But while some might feel the chilling effects of such a targeted attack, Riddell told the Tribune he has no plans to alter his current business practices.

"I've just been going to work, doing what I've been doing every day," he said. "My insurance has been giving me new hardwood floors and a basement remodel. I'm doing just fine."

The Portland Police Bureau says the water ran for an "unknown period of time," causing damage believed to cost tens of thousands of dollars. Riddell says he's beefed up security by adding additional cameras around his office.

Self-described anarchists tipped off Willamette Week to the flooding via encrypted email, writing in part: "Our goal was to cause maximum economic damage, that should serve as a warning to all individuals and businesses that profit off the human misery perpetrated by ICE."

OREGON DOJ PHOTO - Sean RiddellRiddell had been in the news for representing the National ICE Council union, which threatened to sue after Mayor Ted Wheeler restrained local police from clearing a sprawling encampment that temporarily blocked the Southwest Portland immigration facility from operating in June and July 2018.

Riddell, described in the press as "controversial" and "tough-talking," once served as the chief criminal lawyer for the Oregon Department of Justice, but resigned in 2011 after it was discovered that he had been deleting work emails.

The well-known attorney has a message for his critics: "I still look forward to meeting them and them putting their name on their work."

Crime Stoppers of Oregon are offering a reward of up to $2,500 in cash for tips and information.

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