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New survey says state in good company when it comes to amusement and entertainment facilities.

PMG FILE PHOTO - Portland's annual Rose Festival CityFair on the waterfront could be one reason Oregon is considered the ninth most fun state in the nation.Having fun? You should be. You're living in the ninth best state for fun.

Really.

That's what a new report by WalletHub says. The online financial services company reported Monday, June 10, that Oregon was one of the top 10 states in the nation for fun. The No. 1 state is (of course) California. Washington is No. 4.

WalletHub's definition of fun includes enjoyment that "won't break the bank," according to the report. Company researchers looked at 26 indicators in 50 states to see which were most fun. Those include the cost of going to a movie, accessibility of national parks and proximity of casinos (if that's your idea of fun).

WalletHub researchers gave high marks for a state's entertainment and recreation facilities, its nightlife, the number of attractions, its weather, the number of amusement parks and restaurants, the quality of beaches, access to scenic byways, its state and local fairs, average price for beer and wine, its music festivals and the number of performing arts theaters.

For example, California was tops in most restaurants per capita, most movie theaters per capita and most fitness centers per capita. Alaska was tops for its access to national parks. Vermont, Colorado, Montana, Idaho, Maine and Wyoming were tops for most ski slopes per capita. Florida was No. 1 in most marinas per capita.

North Dakota and Wyoming tied at the top for the most state and local money spent on parks and recreation facilities.

The top 10 most fun states to visit, according to WalletHub, are:

1 California

2 Florida

3 New York

4 Washington

5 Colorado

6 Nevada

7 Minnesota

8 Pennsylvania

9 Oregon

10 Texas

West Virginia landed at the bottom of the list as the least-fun state to visit.



Source: WalletHub


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