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Portland Parks & Recreation Bureau uses bond and development charges to add more space for swimmers.

COURTESY PHOTO - North Portland's newly renovated Peninsula Pool has space for 108 more swimmers than the previous design.  An infusion of funding is giving North Portland kids more space to splash.

Peninsula Pool, a public watering hole at 700 N. Rosa Parks Way in the Piedmont neighborhood, re-opened Monday, July 8, with more room — raising the maximum capacity to 296 swimmers from 188.

"Peninsula Pool is a neighborhood treasure," said Commissioner Nick Fish, who oversees Portland Parks & Recreation. "The upgrades will allow more users to enjoy the pool this summer."

COURTESY PHOTO - Construction workers move earth during the renovation and repair of Peninsula Pool and the adjacent community center. The renovation and repair work was budgeted at $4,690,000, with $3.8 million contributed by the Parks Replacement Bond approved by voters in 2014. The remainder came from System Development Charges tacked on to new construction.

New additions to the pool include a wall separating the deep end from the enlarged shallow area, which will host more swim lessons and "free play" for young fishies. There is also a new elevator at the nearby Peninsula Community Center, meaning that people with disabilities will be able to access basement-level classrooms and the dance studio.

"Peninsula Pool has a rich history of serving a multicultural community," noted Parks & Rec Director Adena Long. "The expanded pool is a place where even more neighbors, families and friends can gather and make lasting summer memories."

Repeat visitors will also notice new lighting and gutters, as well as behind-the-scenes upgrades to drainage and water circulation, pumps, the boiler and the filtration system.

Mark Ross, a spokesman for Parks & Rec, described the project as reinvigorating the pool "from the soil up."

COURTESY PHOTO - The revitalization of Peninsula Pool in North Portland cost about $4.7 million.


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