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Multnomah County prosecutors reach plea deal with Christopher Ponte and Matthew Cooper for rioting in Portland.

PMG PHOTO: ZANE SPARLING - A mat with the logo for defunct Portland bar Cider Riot! is shown here. Two men have pleaded guilty to participating in a notorious brawl outside a Portland cidery on May Day in 2019.

Christopher Ponte, 38, and 24-year-old Matthew Cooper cut plea deals with prosecutors on Jan. 13, admitting guilt for one count each of riot, a low-level felony.

Both men will be required to complete 120 hours of community service, remain on supervised probation for three years and not attend any unpermitted street march or protest, according to the Multnomah County District Attorney's Office.

Ponte was additionally sentenced to 10 days in jail, though prosecutors had sought jail time for both men.

MCSO PHOTOS - FROM LEFT: Christopher Ponte and Matthew CooperDeputy District Attorney Sean Hughey said the two men's conduct "fanned the violence, tension and the volatility of this situation, thereby escalating and keeping the riot going."

In a now infamous account, about 15 people led by Patriot Prayer's Joey Gibson approached a group of anti-fascists who had gathered for a post-protest get-together at Cider Riot, sparking a prolonged street tussle that left one woman unconscious after she was hit with a metal baton.

So far, another four men charged in the incident have not been found guilty or innocent: Ian Kramer, 45, who allegedly brandished the baton, as well as Gibson, Russell Schultz and Mackenzie Lewis.

Cider Riot went out of business last year.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story contained an inaccurate headline after an employee who believed they were responding to a groupchat regarding an unrelated matter mistakenly changed the headline of this article, and then posted the story without noticing the error.


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