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With 51 new cases of COVID-19 and 3 more deaths, state modeling shows Oregon has averted 70,000 infections

Health officials say Oregon is successfully "flattening the curve" of new coronavirus cases in the state.

On Friday, April 24, Oregon Health Authority announced the state recorded 51 new cases of COVID-19 and three more deaths, bringing the state's fatalities to 86. To date, Oregon has recorded 2,177 cases. Since the first recorded case in the state, 45,492 people have been tested, according to OHA.

The three people who succumbed to the virus are an 86-year-old man and another 80-year-old man in Multnomah County, along with an 89-year-old man in Marion County. All three people died at their homes and were reported to have underlying medical conditions. It's unclear whether any of the decedents lived in senior care facilities.

The latest COVID-19 cases reported Friday are in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Lane (2), Marion (20), Multnomah (14), Umatilla (2), Washington (8).

A working paper released this week included new data from the Institute for Disease Modeling.

INSTITUTE FOR DISEASE MODELING - Modeling data released by the Oregon Health Authority suggests Oregon may be slowing the rate of growth of new COVID-19 cases."We predict that there have been approximately 8,400 cumulative infections in Oregon, of which 1,900 had been diagnosed by April 16th," the working paper concludes. "We estimate that current interventions have already averted over 70,000 infections, including over 1,500 hospitalizations. Current aggressive interventions will need to be maintained in order to decrease the number of active infections."

"Our modeling continues to show that our collective efforts are working," said Dr. Dean Sidelinger, a state epidemiologist. "And despite the very real hardships these sacrifices have cost Oregonians, we have to keep it up even as we move toward easing restrictions. We need to build on our success in limiting the spread of COVID-19."


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