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It's getting to feel like tradition -- the start of another season of the Woodstock Farmers Market!

DAVID F. ASHTON - Ringing the opening bell for the seasons first Woodstock Farmers Market on June 2nd was Volunteer Coordinator Anna Curtin. From the moment the opening bell rang, shoppers and vendors were greeting one another at the Woodstock Farmers Market. It was opening day – Sunday, June 2 – for the nonprofit market, on the parking lot of the Woodstock Key Bank. With about eight shoppers per minute walking in right from the beginning, it was quickly bustling with activity.

Neighbors not only found a few new hot food sources and produce vendors, but also the many familiar sellers who returned to the market this year.

"It's a little hard to believe, but we're starting our ninth season here today!" exclaimed market manager Emily Murnen. "Neighbors have been really excited, looking forward to the market opening; it's a wonderful time for neighbors to greet one another, and shop with all these amazing vendors!"

The market started off this season with a full complement of 30 vendors each week. Shoppers will find about a third of the vendors are farmers bringing produce and fruit; another quarter of them are the hot food sellers, and balance of the vendors are offering processed food, like meats and cheeses, Murnen calculated.

"I'm so excited that we have farms bringing in such good produce so early in the season, especially after the hard winter," Murnen remarked. "We're really grateful for our volunteers, who help us set up and take down the market, run our 'SNAP Match' program, as well as the kids' activities. And, we're fortunate to have the support of KeyBank, which provides us this great location."

The Woodstock Farmers Market is open every Sunday through October 27, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., in the parking lot behind the Woodstock KeyBank – at 4600 S.E. Woodstock Boulevard. For more information, go online – www.woodstockmarketpdx.com


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