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Businesses are bracing for loss of customers who won't be able to find parking.

Bishops will foot the cost of a new sidewalk built along its western wall by the contractor.Motorists and pedestrians making their way through Multnomah Village will soon see and hear the signs and sounds of the summer construction season.

Sections of Southwest Capitol Highway between Southwest 36th and Southwest Texas are going to be repaved.That stretch runs from half a block past the north end of the Multnomah Bridge to two blocks south of Hoot Owl Corner. Some sections need more work than others and the project's busiest weeks, meaning maximum traffic disruption, will be the last three weeks of July.

During that time, one of Capitol Highway's two lanes will have to be shut down completely so that crews can do what Hannah Schafer with the Portland Bureau of Transportation calls a "full roadway rebuild."

"That means we pull out all the pavement all the way down to the dirt base. We plan to rebuild 18 inches of pavement. There is a lot of history in and under Portland's streets. We anticipate that in Multnomah Village the 100-year-old concrete pavement has deteriorated to a point that it needs to be removed and we might find other surprises underneath that concrete," she wrote in an e mail.

One lane will be open to cars and trucks on an alternating basis, meaning if you're driving northbound or southbound on Capitol Highway during construction hours you can expect to stop and wait when the flagger tells you to. The length of that wait will depend on how many drivers continue to use that route while work is being done.

What limited parking there already is in Multnomah Village on Capitol Highway will be cut back during construction. That has business owners worried enough that four of them and a property owner testified before Portland City Council Wednesday, May 29, the day work was scheduled to begin.

The median on Capitol Highway at Southwest 35th will be shored up as part of the PBOT project set to start in mid-May.Petrel Farkas, owner of Peachtree Gifts at 7843 SW Capitol Highway, told members of the City Council that she and her fellow merchants need a reliable, regularly-updated schedule of where work will be done, signage that's prominent and clear and a $3,000 "customer communication" grant to get out the word about construction.

Barb Cantonwine, owner of Healthy Pets NW at 3612 SW Troy Street, said her store is launching a delivery service for the duration of construction to assist customers who place large orders and would have a tough time getting to her store at 3612 SW Troy Street, right off of Capitol Highway.

The other concern of the Multnomah Village Business Association is that construction work might not be done in time for Multnomah Days on August 17th.Event organizer Christine Lassiter of Allstate Insurance at 3536 SW Troy Street testified before City Council and attended a recent open house PBOT staged.

"The project manager, and a couple of the other guys working on the project did estimate that they would be done with the bulk of the Capitol Highwy portion, going towards Hillsdale, in late July, early August. This is very very close and a little scary," she wrote in an e mail.

Schafer of PBOT told the SW Connection that Lassiter and the other Multnomah Days organizers need not worry.

"We plan to be done," she said.

PBOT has chosen Granite Construction of Vancouver, Washington to repair the pavement and make improvements. The project is estimated to cost $2.6 million, with $1.7 million of that coming from the Fixing Our Streets program, created to invest the extra ten cent gas tax Portland voters approved in 2016.

For a more detailed project schedule and PBOT's description and details of the project see: https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/index.cfm?&a=676333

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