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National Weather Service issues two-day heat warning for Pacific Northwest

PMG PHOTO: NICOLE THILL-PACHECO - Riley Eubanks, 3, dances through a spray of water at the splash pad in Columbia View Park in St. Helens, on Tuesday, Aug. 27, while her sister, MacKenzie Eubanks, 5, lounges on a towel in the background. The two girls visited the park with their grandma, Lori Randolph, on Tuesday as a way to cool off amidst a two-day heat wave. For more on the heat wave, see A7.Columbia County and parts of northwest Oregon and southwest Washington were hit by a heat wave this week, with recorded highs in Scappoose reaching the high 90s.

With hot and dry conditions throughout the region and little overnight relief, officials with the National Weather Service issued a two-day heat advisory, as well as a fire weather watch, for Tuesday and Wednesday, Aug. 27 and 28.

In Scappoose, the National Weather Service reported a high of 98 degrees on Tuesday, and temps in the mid 90s on Wednesday.

The Scappoose Fire District responded to at least one fire Tuesday morning around 11 a.m. when a burn pile in the 55000 block of Fullerton Road got out of control. The small fire began burning into surrounding grass and brush before threatening a nearby structure.

Fire crews reminded residents after the blaze that debris burning under fire watch conditions is prohibited.

On Wednesday morning the Oregon Department of Quality also issued an air quality advisory for the Portland metropolitan region where elevated levels of ozone or smog could affect people who are sensitive to poor air quality.

While Columbia County does not have any official cooling centers, many public places like libraries and city parks with splash pads and water fountains offered some relief for residents to cool off.

Predicted temperatures next week are expected to drop down to the 80s, with lows in the mid- to high-50s. If another heat wave hits, it's good to be able to recognize the signs of heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Officials also recommend limiting time outdoors, taking breaks if you work outside, and to check on relatives, neighbors, the elderly, those with health concerns and those who do not have air conditioning when temps are on the rise.


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