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'When we navigate the crowded isles with the clerks struggling to keep the shelves filled ... pause for just a moment and consider their efforts'

There are many moving parts to our modern society that we rely upon to sustain order and health. Prominent are the police and fire departments. Medical professionals are always at the top of our lists, followed by critical offices of the local, state and federal government, depending on the severity and nature of our needs.

Suddenly, a service we so often take for granted has shown what a key place they occupy in our lives, and I'm referring to the grocery industry. In the midst of the national crisis we are experiencing, the managers, clerks and staff at our local grocery store have found themselves on the front lines of the combat against this virus that has so unsettled our country, and great portions of the world. The trucks delivering the goods are supported by the men and women who maintain the vehicles, and the drivers getting it from the loading docks and safely across the road system. Warehouse workers load the cargo, the food stuffs and goods needed for our homes, while the stores receive it and stock the shelves for our convenience and consumption. It is an intricate ballet that has been stressed for the last weeks but is meeting our needs.

 When we navigate the crowded isles with the clerks struggling to keep the shelves filled with the thousands of items we need, pause for just a moment and consider their efforts. These local neighbors and friends are face to face every day in close proximity to all of us who only venture out when we must. We can shelter in place as our president requests while they are at the job everyday.

Let them know we appreciate their dedication. Shortages are not the fault of our grocery workers; some of the shortages are due to overbuying by anxious shoppers. Shortages and empty shelves also reflect disruption in the supply chain brought on by this new coronavirus.

 All the necessary services that must stay open are staffed by our local friends and neighbors. Take just a moment to express your appreciation for their work. 

Tom Ford

Scappoose

 


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